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Topic: The beginners dilemma (Read 15262 times) previous topic - next topic

TomGeorge

Hi, its great Water Dispersant/Displacer, hence  WD.

I've been told by mechanics that they regard it as a dry lubricant, great to get something stuck moving again, but no long term advantages compared to good oil or grease and regular maintenance.

Tom..... :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

AWOL




Just like this:-


I am going to print a modified copy of this and hang it in my garage, with arrows pointing down to the requisite items on a shelf.

]:) And what if someone switches the items  ]:D

That reminds me of the old joke about the couple who didn't know the difference between putty and vaseline.
All their windows fell out.
"Pete, it's a fool (who) looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.
I speak for myself, not Arduino.

Grumpy_Mike

You mean:-

old joke about the newly wed couple who didn't know .......

Un4gvn

Oh my god! What did they do with the putty?
Zoolander Micro

Un4gvn

I think that WD 40 is a manly scent that should be made into a cologne. Hoppe's #9 would be even better.
Zoolander Micro

SirNickity

Heh..  I showed the engineering flowchart to my GF.  Her reply:  "WD40 isn't a lubricant, it's a solvent."  I was so proud...   :smiley-sweat:

(Shortly followed by: "...what?  I know stuff.")

GoForSmoke


For instance why does my sliding door slide lots easier when I spray "the hard to reach nearly fully enclosed wheels" with WD40?  :smiley-eek:


Collected dirt/dust that the WD cleans out.

Also don't oil bicycle chains except to soak them overnight once a year if you haven't stretched it past usefulness by then. For everyday or weekly cleaning, run the chain through a kerosene soaked rag. Oil on a chain catches dirt and grit that wears the bearings. This from someone that did stretch chains and snap teeth off cogs from a year or less of constant wear.
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

polymorph

Quote
Collected dirt/dust that the WD cleans out.


And that is, indeed, one of the things it is good for.

I had a car with a sticky seatbelt latch. OK when the weather was really dry, but bad when it was damp. Which was a lot of the time, 30 minutes south of Seattle, WA. Sniffing it told me it was some kind of cola spilled in it, probably multiple times.

So I hosed it out with 409 (water based cleaner/degreaser) on stream to wash it out, then WD40 to rinse out all the water. No oil added. Worked great.
Steve Greenfield AE7HD
Drawing Schematics: tinyurl.com/23mo9pf - tinyurl.com/o97ysyx - https://tinyurl.com/Technote8
Multitasking: forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=223286.0
gammon.com.au/blink - gammon.com.au/serial - gammon.com.au/interrupts

JChristensen


Also don't oil bicycle chains except to soak them overnight once a year if you haven't stretched it past usefulness by then. For everyday or weekly cleaning, run the chain through a kerosene soaked rag. Oil on a chain catches dirt and grit that wears the bearings. This from someone that did stretch chains and snap teeth off cogs from a year or less of constant wear.


I've been using this stuff on my road bike and am pretty happy with it:
http://www.finishlineusa.com/products/chain-lubricants/dry-lube

A couple times a year,  I'll take the chain off, give it a thorough de-greasing and cleaning and and also clean what I can off the sprockets by working a rag between them. Just finished a fairly complete tear-down plus replaced the tires so it looks almost factory-new ATM :D

Pedro147

First port of call, Wikipedia.
Second Snopes    http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/household/wd-40.asp   :D
http://www.pedroduino.com

cyberteque

When I worked in a gun shoppe, we used to get guys that went shooting "once in a blue moon", they'd come in with their pride and joy that had been sitting in the cupboard for months, the pre-storage treatment was WD-40/RP-7/CRC <something>.

The poor rifle would be gummed up tight as a<insert tight thing>

That wasn't too bad, you could normally free up the action with a good soak in turps or diesel.

The real worry was Greek or Italian blokes who had LIBERALLY applied olive oil!

Once the volatile bits of olive oil have evaporated what you're left with looks and behaves like epoxy!!

I had to boil a semi-auto .22 every day for nearly 2 weeks before I could get the thing apart!

wizdum


When I worked in a gun shoppe, we used to get guys that went shooting "once in a blue moon", they'd come in with their pride and joy that had been sitting in the cupboard for months, the pre-storage treatment was WD-40/RP-7/CRC <something>.

The poor rifle would be gummed up tight as a<insert tight thing>

That wasn't too bad, you could normally free up the action with a good soak in turps or diesel.

The real worry was Greek or Italian blokes who had LIBERALLY applied olive oil!

Once the volatile bits of olive oil have evaporated what you're left with looks and behaves like epoxy!!

I had to boil a semi-auto .22 every day for nearly 2 weeks before I could get the thing apart!


This is why my "once in a blue moon" gun is a Mosin Nagant. Whenever it sticks, I just have to hit it with a hammer. No solvents required.

polymorph

Quote
19. Lubricates noisy door hinges on vehicles and doors in homes.
27. Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans.


Bullshot Crummond. In both of these instances, in my own experience and that of other people I've known, this is only true very temporarily. My father destroyed the door hinges on my car because, unbeknownst to me, he was hosing out my door hinges with WD40 every time I came to visit. I kept regreasing my hinges, not knowing why it kept disappearing, but WD40 washed out all traces of the grease and got them grinding again. After around a year of this (I don't know when he started doing this), I could only close the driver's side door if I lifted it up.

I've used it to lubricate squeaky door hinges, only to later have them get even worse. A couple drops of 3 in 1 oil fixed it.

I tried it on some stiff fan bearings. Sure, it clean them out, but left them basically dry. In a relatively short time, they started squalling. A little 3 in 1 oil extended the life. For those fan bearings, I've found a good light spray cleaner to work well, let dry, then followed by a few drops of 3 in 1 or sewing machine oil.

I've repaired electronics that people have sprayed WD40 into. Pots that have seized up, sliding pots especially. Cassette decks with swollen rubber and no oil in the bearings. VCRs that stink of WD40 because someone just opened the door and hosed it down due to a squeak, or because someone told them to clean their VCR heads that way.

It has its uses, but a lubricating oil it is not. It bugs me when people treat anything as a panacea.

BTW, if you have someone working on your furnace or ducting and you see them using cloth fabric "duct" tape (actually duck tape) on it, fire them on the spot because they don't know what they are doing. Hire someone else in, ask to see his/her roll of duct tape. Only if it is actual aluminum tape, have them check the other person's work and complete the repair.

What everyone calls "duct" tape is really duck tape, invented to make quick, temporary waterproof repairs to things like ammo cans and such for WW2. As anyone who has ever used it on anything outdoors knows, it breaks down quickly in heat and cold. As anyone who has used it or had someone else use it to tape down an extension cord knows, it becomes this sticky mess that is nearly impossible to entirely remove. That's why roadies use gaffer tape, even though it is much more expensive.
Steve Greenfield AE7HD
Drawing Schematics: tinyurl.com/23mo9pf - tinyurl.com/o97ysyx - https://tinyurl.com/Technote8
Multitasking: forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=223286.0
gammon.com.au/blink - gammon.com.au/serial - gammon.com.au/interrupts

polymorph

If there are no moving parts to stick, olive oil is great! I use it on my fencing blades, very thin coat.
Steve Greenfield AE7HD
Drawing Schematics: tinyurl.com/23mo9pf - tinyurl.com/o97ysyx - https://tinyurl.com/Technote8
Multitasking: forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=223286.0
gammon.com.au/blink - gammon.com.au/serial - gammon.com.au/interrupts

GoForSmoke

There is or was a duct tape used by people who made and installed air ducts. It is or was more permanent than the cheap cloth tape substitutes sold in retail stores today.

Gaffer's tape... now that's like gold, or at least it used to be.
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

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