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Topic: Aurel RX 4MM5 433mhz Receiver (Read 3092 times) previous topic - next topic

bwww

Hello all,

I have spent so much time trying to figure out how to receive weather data over 433mhz on my Arduino-compatible Freetronics EtherTen (Uno compatible). I have tried everything I can think of, so I have come to ask for advice.

I am trying to recreate this project:

http://www.mattlary.com/2012/06/23/weather-station-project/

I am using the same receiver module and transmitter (Oregon Scientific sensor). I have soldered a wire antenna (165mm in length) to the antenna pin of the RX module.

I am not sure if I need any passive components between the RX 4MM5 and my Arduino-compatible board? Do I?

The signals I am getting are messed up. They are not being able to be decoded correctly. I have tested with multiple transmitters. None of their signals are being decoded correctly.

Any other advice would be much appreciated. I have completely run out of ideas!

Here is the RX 4MM5 datasheet:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/c67bq4jrvhjs24k/RX_4MM5%28full%29%20%281%29.pdf

This is the sketch I am running:

https://bitbucket.org/mattlary/weatherlogger/raw/974c775f5a69e8a4902715ae3d0a19ea2f00cb9d/Ook_OSV2.ino

This is the Arduino-compatible I am using (in case it makes a difference):

http://www.freetronics.com/products/etherten

jremington

What is the exact model number of your Oregon Scientific sensor? There are many OS sensors and so far, three different RF protocols in use.

bwww

I have a Oregon Scientific THGR122NX (which the blogger I linked to above used) and a Oregon Scientific THN132N. I cannot get either to be picked up.

All I get is "CRES" data, which I think is just the result of noise.

bwww

Do I need a pull-down resistor on the data pin? If I do, what value should I be using? I have tried some high Kohm resistors and it did not improve anything.

mauried

Try using this application.
http://www.osengr.org/WxShield/Web/WxShield-Downloads.html
Im running it on a Uno with a mix of V2 and V3 Oregon Sensors.
Works fine.


jremington

You can verify that the receiver is actually receiving signals by examining the output directly. Use an oscilloscope or a laptop audio in, with Audacity. Here are a couple of examples http://fredboboss.free.fr/?cat=290  http://rayshobby.net/?p=8827

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