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Topic: Heating a steel storage tank (Read 582 times) previous topic - next topic

csaw325

Does anyone have a calcultor or formulas for tank heating? I have a steel storage tank 80 ft dia.by 85 ft tall and need to maintain a skin temperature of 60 deg. F with a design temp of -1 deg. F. I need to know how many BTU's to supply. Thanks for any help.

keeper63

Does anyone have a calcultor or formulas for tank heating? I have a steel storage tank 80 ft dia.by 85 ft tall and need to maintain a skin temperature of 60 deg. F with a design temp of -1 deg. F. I need to know how many BTU's to supply. Thanks for any help.
A buttload? /snark

Seriously, though - something here might help:

http://www.wisconsinperspective.com/key-water-heating-charts/

So - you would have to convert your tank size into gallons, then use one of the formulas on that page (for heating water - I'm not certain whether other liquids would need different formulas). Of course, I think those forumulas are for heating up the entire amount of liquid, and not just for the surface (which I would think would also need to involve ambient temperature at the surface, too).

But that should get you started, at least.
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

robtillaart

The heat needed is eventually the heat radiated away.

The heat radiated away depends on
- size of the surface
- is the tank closed on all sides or open on top? (diff heat loss)
- on the amount of liquid in the tank (the lower part will loose more heat)
- the delta with the outside temperature. (yeah it is a differential equation in the end)

 
So proper insulation might help keeping costs (and CO2 emission) low

If the tank is full the contents is  1/4 * 80 ft * 80ft * PI * 85 ft ~ 3,200,000 gallons
That is quite large, is it for wine or ?

The outside surface is 80 ft *PI * 85 ft + 2 * 1/4 * 80 ft * 80ft * PI = 31,146 sqr ft 
assuming top is closed

Rob Tillaart

Nederlandse sectie - http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html -
(Please do not PM for private consultancy)

Chagrin

There's also Newton's Law of Cooling: the rate at which the tank will cool off is proportional to its temperature vs ambient temperature.

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