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Topic: High Temperature LED strips? (Read 800 times) previous topic - next topic

Qdeathstar

Hi,

I am trying to light up the inside of my 3D printer which as a heated enclosure. The heated enclosure gets up to about 75C and i'm finding that the typical LED strips that i am using are not up to task.

Anyone know of any led strips that are able to deal with higher temperatures? They don't nessarily have to be strips, as long as they aren't huge and are fairly flat.

Thanks!
A creaking creeping shadow
stiff against the freezing fog
glares at a tickless watch.

Time has failed him -- all things shall pass.

raschemmel

Is there enough room for fans ?
Arduino UNOs, Pro-Minis, ATMega328, ATtiny85, LCDs, MCP4162, keypads,<br />DS18B20s,74c922,nRF24L01, RS232, SD card, RC fixed wing, quadcopter

Qdeathstar

Well, the issue is I don't want to cool the air inside the chamber... So i could add fans, but would that have an effect if the air they are blowing is ~75c?
A creaking creeping shadow
stiff against the freezing fog
glares at a tickless watch.

Time has failed him -- all things shall pass.

KeithRB

Since LED's don't sweat, it will have no effect.

Qdeathstar

Well, the don't sweat but they do turn brown and start blinking.... maybe they are trying to make tears when they blink? So, is the answer no? I kinda figured that since google wasn't helping and that LEDS need to be kept relatively cool to survive... :(
A creaking creeping shadow
stiff against the freezing fog
glares at a tickless watch.

Time has failed him -- all things shall pass.

INTP

The 5050 SMD LEDs sold as 194 sockets for automotive use seem to be pretty temperature stable. I have some running in the same enclosure as my HID lights which get pretty hot, and they've lasted 2-3 years. But I have no way of knowing who actually made them, just something to look into, though.

Grumpy_Mike

Most commercial components are only rated for 70C. You normally have to go to military spec to get above.
Mount the LEDs outside the chamber and have a glass or Lexon window to let the light in.

ElCaron

Well, the don't sweat but they do turn brown and start blinking.... maybe they are trying to make tears when they blink? So, is the answer no? I kinda figured that since google wasn't helping and that LEDS need to be kept relatively cool to survive... :(
I guess the idea way that fans could only cool the LEDs in a 75°C environment, if there was a liquid to evaporate, causing a cooling effect.
- Fans cool electronics by transporting as much cool air to the hot surfaces as possible. Then energy is transferred to the air and transported away. This works only if the air is cooler than the desired temperature of the device to be cooled.
- In addition fans also cool people by transporting as much dry air to the sweaty surfaces as possible. Then, sweat evaporates and take energy in form of enthalpy of vaporization with it. This works also when the air is hotter than the person to be cooled.

You do not have air that is cool enough to bring your LEDs to a healthy temperature, so you would need the second effect. So it is either moving them out, or (not really meant as a suggestion ...) mount them on a Peltier element.

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