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Topic: Share tips you have come across (Read 26272 times) previous topic - next topic

larryd

I did not have an Arduino Mega2560 yet, wanted to get more I/O for a test jig I making.
86 I/O lines, (16 analog inputs, 4 hardware serial, 74 digital I/O)
All in a dip package.

Also, the 1284 Logger not shown here, has two hardware serial ports and a micro SD card for logging. Placing it in a serial data analyzer I am working on.

What you see here is a hardware staging breadboard discussed earlier on this thread.

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The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#331
Jul 12, 2017, 02:17 am Last Edit: Jul 12, 2017, 02:19 am by larryd
Every now and then you might want to protect PCB components with a piece of clear plastic.
The clear plastic allows LEDs, LCDs, etc. to show through and it protects things from accidentally shorting.

Save those old DVD/CD cases and use them to do the job.
These cases are about .05 inches thick and are easily cut to size.







No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

Coding Badly


ballscrewbob

My preference is for CARVER clamps but almost impossible to find on the shelf in US and Canada.

They make irwin clamps and similar look like beginners clamps. LOL
It may not be the answer you were looking for but its the one I am giving based on either experience, educated guess, google or the fact that you gave nothing to go with in the first place so I used my wonky crystal ball.

larryd

#334
Jul 12, 2017, 07:25 pm Last Edit: Jul 12, 2017, 07:34 pm by larryd
Per image #3 in post 331.
Made some of these boards a few weeks back.
They greatly speed up wiring and in checking out that code with LEDs and switches.
Just plug the assembly in the female headers.
6 LEDs and 6 PB switches.
Having the PCB on a 18" umbilical cord makes things quite convenient.












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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

Boardburner2

#335
Jul 13, 2017, 12:08 am Last Edit: Jul 13, 2017, 12:08 am by Boardburner2
Anyone know of a cheap source of flux in the UK that i can use with a dropper or nail file brush please ?
Pens are rather expensive , all i want is the flux.

larryd

#336
Aug 22, 2017, 06:19 am Last Edit: Aug 22, 2017, 06:20 am by larryd
Make your breadboard jumpers well ahead of time.
A good source for wires is old computer and Telco cables.
For breadboards, I recommend Telco #22 and #24 AWG wires, but prefer #24.
Both stranded and solid #24 AWG is available in the Telco color code scheme.
My preference is to use #24 AWG 'stranded wire' for jumpers but you must do some work to make them usable.
The Telco coloring has five tracer group colors: White, Red, Black, Yellow and Violet.
Each tracer group, has five color pairs: Blue, Orange, Green, White and Slate.
One complete bundle contains 25 pairs or 50 wires.
50 wire colors give a well diversified color layout for your breadboard projects.
I like the version where the insulation is one solid color (eg: White) with a quick splash of color (eg: Blue)
W/BE is the TIP wire and BE/W is the RING wire.
A big part in wire preparation is the tinning of the stranded wire.
A solder pot is ideal but a soldering iron is adequate; using flux is advised.  












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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

Watcher

#337
Aug 22, 2017, 07:13 am Last Edit: Aug 22, 2017, 07:16 am by Watcher
I really liked the trick with the CD case plastic protection.

On a similar note, how would you insulate a part of a PCB track that has been left bare (no mask) intentionally in order to enhance the ampacity with additional solder + copper later. For example see the following picture of a PCB I made:






The top tracks are shown bare, exposed . Reason is I intend to add additional layers of solder and copper to increase their current carrying capacity as they will be carrying upto 10A at 240V AC (relay footprint below).
It would be nice to add some kind of insulation later on. Is their any sort of insulating spray / lacquer ?

larryd

#338
Aug 22, 2017, 08:00 am Last Edit: Aug 22, 2017, 08:02 am by larryd
First off, solder mask is designed for masking solder flow during the soldering process.
It offers some insulation quality but is not designed for such.

In your example consider this using slippery tape.
The glue it uses is outstanding.
http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=32182&cat=1,110,43466,32182



Kapton tape might be an option.


A third option is epoxy glue or clear silicone glue, I have used both as electrical insulation.


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The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

Watcher

Quote
A third option is epoxy glue or clear silicone glue, I have used both as electrical insulation.
How about hot glue, from glue sticks ?

ElCaron

How about hot glue, from glue sticks ?
I would like to know that too. I have certainly seen a lot of hot glue in commercial products. On the other hand, it is often very hard to find a datasheet for hot glue (not even for brand stuff like Steinl) and you never know what is in the batch at hand. Might work with one and fail with another. I like to use black one lately, because it looks better, but color adds another factor of uncertainty.

larryd

#341
Aug 22, 2017, 06:39 pm Last Edit: Aug 22, 2017, 06:41 pm by larryd
I have also used hot glues.
There are several consistencies available.

If the areas are perfectly flat, tape works well and is reversible.

Silicone glue is my favourite, but is difficult to remove.
Hot glue is more easily removed when needed, but does not adhere as well as silicone.
Glues are good for non flat areas such as soldered pads, terminals, switch leads etc.
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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

Jiggy-Ninja

#342
Aug 22, 2017, 07:29 pm Last Edit: Aug 22, 2017, 07:31 pm by Jiggy-Ninja
If you're looking for a self-adjusting wire stripper, avoid one where the cutting head has inset blades in the "mandibles" (can't think of anything else to call them).


Garbage

The blade destroys several strands of stranded wire no matter what I do, and on solid-core wire it's just as likely to pull the wire through the insulation as it is to pull the insulation off. The tension adjust knob is worthless, and needs to be almost completely unscrewed to make any real difference. The knob is also not captive, so you can take it completely off and let the spring fall out if you want (three cheers for removable and easily losable parts!). On any tension setting except "bare minimum before the knob falls out", there's at least a 50% chance of cutting straight through 22-gauge solid-core instead of stripping it. Squeezing it has a raspy quality that feels like nails on a chalkboard.

If you couldn't tell by now, I hate this tool. It is literally useless at performing what should be its primary function. Free would still not be cheap enough for this tool to be worth it.

No, if you're going to get one, get the style where the "mandibles" are solid molded chucks of metal. Literally everything bad about the previous style is good in this one. The tension adjust actually makes a difference, the adjustment screw is captive, the mandible edge doesn't nick or damage the wire, and the squeezing feels much smoother and doesn't give make shivers crawl up my spine.


The good kind.

I'm also not a fan of the "muncher" style. The blades are similar to the first style and damage the wire, and I can't figure out what difference any setting on the alleged "tension adjust" knob makes. The wire cutter is good though.


Muncher style
Hackaday: https://hackaday.io/MarkRD
Advanced C++ Techniques: https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=493075.0

larryd

#343
Aug 22, 2017, 07:47 pm Last Edit: Aug 22, 2017, 07:53 pm by larryd
"can't think of anything else to call them"
Friday the 13th killing weapon.

For smallish wire mentioned above, I love these.





Available in many wire sizes:







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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#344
Aug 22, 2017, 09:47 pm Last Edit: Aug 22, 2017, 09:57 pm by larryd
Some breadboard stuff.











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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

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