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Topic: 330v 190uF capacitor (Read 3168 times) previous topic - next topic

smkoberg

Hey guys and gals;

My digital camera decided to crap out on me a few weeks ago and I just got around to taking it apart to see if I could fix it. No luck. What I did find, though, is a 330v 190uF capacitor for the flash element.

I was wondering what this could be used for outside of a flash for a camera.

pwillard

Oddly enough, that value is pretty much most commonly for that specific application.

With the 330V being quite high it therefore make the item rather LARGE when compared to 190uF (200uF) of the 16V variety.  You can use it anywhere 200uF is called for... just keep in mind it will be physically larger than the lower voltage version.

simon.monk

If you decide to use it, be very careful taking it out, these things stay charged up for ages and 330V hurts - here speaks the voice of experience!

So check it with a voltmeter and discharge it before soldering!

Incidentally - single-use cameras have the same kind of caps in them. And a neat little charging circuit that runs on 1.5V - youch!
--
I write books about Arduino and Electronics: http://simonmonk.org

rocketgeek

Capacitors of that size (and larger!) should always be carefully shorted before working with them... and they should be stored with the leads shorted in order to prevent them from self-charging over time.

retrolefty

Quote
and they should be stored with the leads shorted in order to prevent them from self-charging over time.


Self-charging while out of circuit? That is a new one for me. Do you have a link that  explains such a phenomena?

swetrack

That was a nice capacitor.
I would use it in some cool project involving nixi tubes, wich i think are awesome. They requires a little higher voltage than the arduino :)

rocketgeek


Self-charging while out of circuit? That is a new one for me. Do you have a link that  explains such a phenomena?


It's a serious safety hazard in large pulse capacitors, but I have been bitten by smaller caps I had previously discharged. I'm having trouble finding a good link on the subject b/c the Google results are contaminated with ZPG crap.

westfw

Self-charging is a well known phenomena with high voltage caps, presumably due to electret effects in the dielectric.  I don't think I've ever seen it mentioned in the case of "only" a couple hundred volts (although you can get bitten by not fully discharging such a cap.  For example, firing the flash using such a cap, with the batteries removed, can leave enough voltage on the cap to give you quite a surprise...)

Good reading at http://www.repairfaq.org/sam/strbfaq.htm (and the reset of the repairfaq.org site as well.)

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