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Topic: Interfacing Arduino with 8.4V servo? (Read 2719 times) previous topic - next topic

amanmazleigh

I was given two servos. The specs can be found here. http://www.tonegawaseiko.co.jp/pro/e_pro01.html How do i connect the servo to Arduino? I could easily do it with my other servos, but this particular servo have five wires. haha. I've seen the picture from the link on how to connect the servo, but it is connected to a RX, not Arduino. I tried wiring the servo like how I always do. The red wire to Arduino's 5V and the black wire to GND. The orange wire connected to Pin 3. And I tried the servo with Arduino's sweep example. But the servo doesn't work. I tried using the two other wires that comes danging out of the servo. Why are there five wires instead of three? Please help me. Thanks!

vinceherman

This picture from your spec page should give you indications of how to use it.
http://www.tonegawaseiko.co.jp/pro/images/050_b2.jpg

It looks like the 2 separate wires are for the servo power source.
And the 3 wire set goes to a standard RC receiver, so you would wire those to the arduino.

Of course, this is guesswork based on the photos, but it looks like what they have displayed.

amanmazleigh

does it mean that the servo requires two power supply? and yeah like i said i saw the pic. but i dont understand hahaha

vinceherman

That is how I would take it.
It looks like they have a 7.2v NiCad pack hooked up.
The specs give torque ratings for 4.8 up to 8.4 v, so you could likely use 4 alkaline batteries to power the servo to test things. (or any source between 4.8 and 8.4v that can provide a decent amount of current)
But do use a separate power source from the Arduino.  Those are monster servos.  You want them on separate sources to prevent voltage drop on the Arduino which will cause all kinds of problems.


keeper63


That is how I would take it.
It looks like they have a 7.2v NiCad pack hooked up.
The specs give torque ratings for 4.8 up to 8.4 v, so you could likely use 4 alkaline batteries to power the servo to test things. (or any source between 4.8 and 8.4v that can provide a decent amount of current)
But do use a separate power source from the Arduino.  Those are monster servos.  You want them on separate sources to prevent voltage drop on the Arduino which will cause all kinds of problems.


I would suggest that your "4 alkaline batteries" be C or D size cells; anything smaller would likely run out quickly. In fact, you might just purchase a 7.2 volt R/C NiMH pack or similar; it will have a greater mAh rating than an alkaline pack, and you can recharge it. For bench testing, though, I would get a proper regulated power supply if you can.
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

amanmazleigh

I do understand about the voltage supply part. But I'm confused about which wire I should use to connect the battery to. Because there are five wires. There's two pairs of black and red wire and also one orange wire which I know is the signal wire. So which pair should I use?


And regarding the signal wire, let's say I hook up a 7.2V battery to the power supply. Do I have to somehow supply 7.2V supply to the signal wire too? Or I can just hook the wire up to lets say Pin 3 of the Arduino?

Mr_Manny

Do the wires not have connectors ? The picture seems pretty clear unless the wires are bare.
If the wires are bare, you need to get the diagram for your servo.

amanmazleigh


Do the wires not have connectors ? The picture seems pretty clear unless the wires are bare.
If the wires are bare, you need to get the diagram for your servo.


Hmm one red wire, one black wire and one orange wire is grouped together like how servos are usually grouped together. The other two wires (black and red) are bare.

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