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Topic: Switch audio sources (Read 3423 times) previous topic - next topic

statue4

Then look on eBay for an adaptor board.
Is there any specific nomenclature you could teach me for getting the right thing?

Grumpy_Mike

You look at the IC package type in the data sheet and then google
sdip 30 breakout board

INTP

Running audio signal through an electromechanical relay sounds like something that would give an audiophile a panic attack.

christop

Running audio signal through an electromechanical relay sounds like something that would give an audiophile a panic attack.
Then again, even a metal coat hanger can sound as good as a Monster audio cable.

:-P

INTP

Power cables and audio cables are kept separate, coat hanger or otherwise. Electromechanical relay is quite literally as not that as possible.

DVDdoug

#20
Apr 10, 2018, 08:02 pm Last Edit: Apr 10, 2018, 08:07 pm by DVDdoug
Quote
Running audio signal through an electromechanical relay sounds like something that would give an audiophile a panic attack.
There's nothing wrong with running an audio signal through a switch or relay.    In fact if you've ever built any of this stuff, you are a lot more likely to have "audio problems" with solid state switching.   (You can get good results either way but relays are easier.)

If the "audiophile" has a panic attack that's only because he knows there's a relay/switch in the signal path.     And of course when they fail the scientific-blind listening test, they'll tell you there's something wrong with the test or they will tell you that blind listening tests are always  invalid.   :smiley-roll:   

...The audiophile community is mostly nuts.  (And, a lot of them are older guys with the normal high-frequency hearing-loss that comes with age.)

INTP

Switch, fine. That's basically what happens when you plug into a jack anyway.

But still that power line thing. The relay coil is just that, and DESIGNED to be close enough to the 'audio signal' in order to move that lever in the first place. It's guaranteed to be in the magnetic field, else the relay wouldn't work.

I'm not an anal audiophile, but you don't have to be one to hear a buzz in an audio signal. You are right, it may still work and be unnoticeable. Won't know until it's built. Or just build it the first time in a way that that doesn't leave that possibility on the table.

Grumpy_Mike

Quote
It's guaranteed to be in the magnetic field, else the relay wouldn't work.
But a magnetic field does not in of itself generate a buzz. You might be a bit of induced voltage in an audio line due to ripple but most relays work with a saturated field so even that will not induce any interference.

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