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Topic: Credit card chip contacts (Read 767 times) previous topic - next topic

dougp

I've seen credit cards with yellow contacts and with dull silver contacts.  Does anybody know what is the material used for these two varieties?

TIA
Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real.  If quantum mechanics hasn't profoundly shocked you, you haven't understood it yet. - Niels Bohr

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Robin2

Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

dougp

Thanks for the reply.  I thought of those two but it seems an expensive option for a credit card. 
Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real.  If quantum mechanics hasn't profoundly shocked you, you haven't understood it yet. - Niels Bohr

No private consultations undertaken!

Robin2

Thanks for the reply.  I thought of those two but it seems an expensive option for a credit card. 
There won't be very much of it. I'd guess you would need to recycle a large number of cards to get $100 worth of gold.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

dougp

There won't be very much of it. I'd guess you would need to recycle a large number of cards to get $100 worth of gold.

...R
Yes, if it's a precious metal the thickness is probably measured in 10/1000ths of an inch.
Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real.  If quantum mechanics hasn't profoundly shocked you, you haven't understood it yet. - Niels Bohr

No private consultations undertaken!

Coding Badly


I believe the unit of measure for such things is µin (microinch).


Robin2

Yes, if it's a precious metal the thickness is probably measured in 10/1000ths of an inch.
10/1000 = 1/100. If the gold was that thick my card would be worth more than the amount in my account.

I suspect microns is the more likely unit of measurement. Or the even smaller micro-inch that @Coding Badly mentioned. I never heard of micro-inch before - but that may be just because I am on the right side of the Atlantic.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Coding Badly

Or the even smaller micro-inch that @Coding Badly mentioned.
After a spot check a Digi-Key:  That does seem to be a common unit for gold alloy contact coatings.  50 to 200 seems to be a common range.


Robin2

A micro-inch is 0.0254 microns so 50 µin would be 1.27 microns.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

dougp

10/1000 = 1/100.
I misstated. My intent was .0001 inch. Apparently even that's much more than needed.
Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real.  If quantum mechanics hasn't profoundly shocked you, you haven't understood it yet. - Niels Bohr

No private consultations undertaken!

dougp

After a spot check a Digi-Key:
Wish I'd thought of that.  I put 'credit card metal' and a few variations in the search bar and got lots of off-target results.

But, I did learn that there are metal credit cards. Who knew?
Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real.  If quantum mechanics hasn't profoundly shocked you, you haven't understood it yet. - Niels Bohr

No private consultations undertaken!

Robin2

I misstated.
I had figured that. I was just having fun.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

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