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Topic: Punctuation Marks and Etc. of the English Language  (Read 4535 times) previous topic - next topic

Robin2

Was the word 'science' formed based on the stated rules?
I doubt if any word was formed based on rules - the rules came after.

Quote
If not, why are we so aware about the syntactical and semantic rules
I suspect the vast majority of the population is not so aware.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

larryd

"There are lots of rules like 'i' before 'e' except after 'c' , but not much science."

or words that have gh

Oh there are so many rules. :(



No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

AWOL

"Pete, it's a fool (who) looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.
I speak for myself, not Arduino.

ardly

Neat.

I think you will discover that the I before E rule only applies when the sound is an eee

...R
Ah, that is another layer to the rule (it is a bit like the rule for leap years).
The basic rule is "i before e" so "Science" should be spelled "Science".
However; the "except after c" part means it should be spelled "Sceince".
However; because the sound is not "eee" it should be spelled "Science"!
Of course it is not that simple :)

There are words like "height" and "weight" where there is no 'c' but 'i' does not come before 'e'.


I had a go at some pseudo code, but I think the rule is that there is no rule;

Code: [Select]
if following 'c'
{
if sound is not 'eee'
{
"i before e"  // e.g. science - shot down by ?
}
else
{
"e before i" // e.g. fluorescein - but shot down by specie
}
}
else
{
if sound is not 'eee'
{
"e before i" // e.g. height - but shot down by identifier
}
else
{
"i before e" // e.g. field - but shot down by seize
}
}









"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored" - Aldous Huxley

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