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Topic: Add an ESP8266 in an RC socket (Read 126 times) previous topic - next topic

max13

I have bought these radio-controlled sockets on Amazon, and I would like to connect an ESP8266 on one of them to be able to control it on Wifi.

I've opened one of them, and as I'm more software programmer than electronicist, I tried to understand how the chips were powered using 220v without using a regulator, on which I would try to connect my ESP8266 or another regulator to get 3.3v.

Also, I managed to read the "model" of one chip (but struggled to find a datasheet with the pinouts, failing for now), and I wasn't able to read anything on the second one.

So I have 2 questions:

  • How can I determine where to get power for my ESP8266?
  • On which pin on which IC can I solder a pin of my ESP8266 to send a signal and simulate the remote being pressed?


Here are some pictures of the board:



Thank you for your help.

Paul_KD7HB

Read the text on the top of the black thing on your board. It is a 24 volt DC power supply.

Paul

max13

#2
Jan 14, 2019, 10:41 pm Last Edit: Jan 14, 2019, 10:45 pm by max13
Are you talking about the thing on which « BPD-SS-124DM » is written?



I think it's the relay. The yellow thing seems to be a capacitor, i'll Look at what it is

bluejets

#3
Jan 14, 2019, 11:34 pm Last Edit: Jan 14, 2019, 11:43 pm by bluejets
Read the text on the top of the black thing on your board. It is a 24 volt DC power supply.

Paul
Looks to me like a 24v relay indicated by the relay coil symbol and 24vdc next to it. The mains voltage numbering would be the contact ratings.

I'd be looking to use a plug pack for your project.

Your existing board is more than likely a non-isolated supply. Fine for a commercial fully enclosed piece of gear but dangerous to start bringing circuitry or wiring out into the open so-to-speak.

There are other alternatives to controlling mains sockets via wifi that you do not have to hack which are much safer.
I'd suggest you do some searching there.

max13

#4
Jan 14, 2019, 11:39 pm Last Edit: Jan 15, 2019, 03:56 am by max13
I'd be looking to use a plug pack for your project.
What is a plug pack? Can you give me an example?

Your existing board is more than likely a non-isolated supply. Fine for a commercial fully enclosed piece of gear but dangerous to start bringing circuitry or wiring out into the open so-to-speak.
I agree. I'm thinking about hot-gluing the board or my new circuit (to isolate it) before closing it for good.

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