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Topic: Your grandfathers logic (Read 19546 times) previous topic - next topic

Paul_KD7HB

Are there any pros to core logic over transistor based logic?
Are there any pros to core logic over transistor based logic?
Certainly! They don't loose their settings when power goes off. And battery backup is not necessary.

Paul

AWOL

I recall (from very long ago) a presentation about the Apollo missions. There was a ring that appeared like a spacer or gap filler between the top of stage1 and the bottom of stage2. It got thrown away when stage1 was jettisoned. According to the presentation that "spacer" contained a complete IBM360 which was responsible for launch stability.

This was at a time when college students were using punch-cards to run assembler programs on the college IBM360 which was treated like the Holy Grail.

...R
The instrumentation ring was much further up the stack (just below the LM, I think), was built by IBM, but was only four feet deep, so I doubt it had much of a 360 in it.
"Pete, it's a fool (who) looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.
I speak for myself, not Arduino.

Robin2

#17
Jan 10, 2019, 04:56 pm Last Edit: Jan 10, 2019, 04:57 pm by Robin2
The instrumentation ring was much further up the stack (just below the LM, I think), was built by IBM, but was only four feet deep, so I doubt it had much of a 360 in it.
I apologise for my poor memory.

It may have only been 4 feet deep but it had a large circumference so I suspect the available volume was significant - I'm assuming all the stuff was laid out around the circumference to keep the centre clear.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Paul_KD7HB

I honestly didn't expect this many people to be interested....
if that was then and this is now. What's next I wonder?? In the terms of logic.
Quantum entanglement and using that in computing. Both are NOT logical, but seem to be useful!

Paul

larryd

I often wondered if it was possible to hear a frame of core memory in operation.

However, they usually necessarily operated in noisy (132 column drum line printers, tape drives, washing machine-sized disk drives, air-con...) environments, so I never got the chance to find out.
That reminds me about wearing hearing protection while doing line printer maintenance
95+db and breathing paper dust. :(




No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

Paul_KD7HB

That reminds me about wearing hearing protection while doing line printer maintenance
95+db and breathing paper dust. :(





Was that an IBM printer? The 1100LPM train printer was pretty loud with the doors open.

I wrote a program to be used to clean a special print train for printing(typing) letters that looked like they came from an IBM Selectric typewriter. Otherwise, a stand-alone program had to be used and that meant shutting down the machine. All Slugs had to be cleaned before starting the letters.

The local field engineer warned me to NEVER try to print in the exact order of the characters on the print slugs. Said it would jam the train and make it explode. I took him at his word!

Paul

larryd

No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

Paul_KD7HB

IBM and ICL



I recall walking into the computer room one morning and the FE had the 1100 lpm printer all torn apart. Something had shorted in the magnet assembly and burned up all the coils and threw hot solder all over the housing. But he had it up and running by noon. Great company and great people!

Paul

larryd

#23
Jan 11, 2019, 01:45 am Last Edit: Jan 11, 2019, 01:46 am by larryd
Capacitor banks in some of the printers were 5 Farads at 36v.

??? No screw drivers went near their wiring!



No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

GoForSmoke

Ahhh, core memory, the choice of Apollo Guidance Computer.
It's less vulnerable to cosmic particles than chip, that includes data as it takes magnitudes more energy to change a core bit than a chip bit.

1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

Robin2

It's less vulnerable to cosmic particles than chip, that includes data as it takes magnitudes more energy to change a core bit than a chip bit.
That's why there is a hole in the middle - to let the particles through.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Henry_Best

That's why there is a hole in the middle - to let the particles through.
POLOrisation?

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