Go Down

Topic: Wires: What for? (Read 472 times) previous topic - next topic

Paul__B

If tinning the end of multi-strand wire, the trick is to twist the strands together, tin just the very tip then pull back the insulation at least 5 mm, twist and tin the exposed area again, then while still hot, pull the insulation forward over part of the tinned area so that the transition from tinned (stiff) to not tinned (flexible) is well covered by the insulation.

It is this transition point that will experience the greatest bending force from wire movement and tend to break; you need it to be reinforced by the insulation to provide a strain relief.

Southpark

It makes them brittle... easier to break off.  Also possibility of melting the insulation.
I see! Thanks wolframore. Definitely makes sense. The jst connectors are kind of small .... and soldering could lead to some fiddly issues that's for sure.

larryd

Is that due to too much solder can stop the pin from going into the plastic housing?
Any flex of the wire will cause the breakage at the point where the solder ends.



Crimp pins are designed for maximum flex life when you "do not" tin/solder the stripped wire ends!

The strain relief, that grips the insulation, is very import to prevent against wire breakage.



No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

Bringamosa

I love single core wire from cat5 cable on my perfboards. Easy to route

As soon somethng leaves the board I'll use multi core.


larryd

#19
Mar 23, 2019, 07:41 pm Last Edit: Mar 23, 2019, 07:44 pm by larryd
No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

Southpark

Any flex of the wire will cause the breakage at the point where the solder ends.
Crimp pins are designed for maximum flex life when you "do not" tin/solder the stripped wire ends!
The strain relief, that grips the insulation, is very import to prevent against wire breakage.
Thanks Larry. Makes excellent sense.

Geek Emeritus

I use:

  • female headers with solid core wires soldered to them on the module end
  • male headers on the Arduino end
  • hot glued so strain on the wires is taken by the insulation and the glue, not the connection
  • 4-40 nylon couplers, AKA standoffs
  • supporting P shaped nylon clamps


no motion, no strain. no possibility of switching two wires.
All PMs will be deleted unopened due to arrogant argumentative pot stirring Malfoys.
 If you have not read "How to use this forum - please read", in particular: "7. If you are posting code or error messages, use "code" tags":  expect rude responses

wolframore

If you are crimping JST just make sure you are using the actual crimping tool.  This weekend I crimped a huge 0 gauge battery terminal for my truck.  The cold welding that occurs from crimping works well.  The old connector just got brittle from old age and possibly got bent at some point.

The new crimp was done and it is as strong as a solder joint, maybe even stronger with no stiff points from solder wicking up the wire.
Bad boys rate our young girls but Violet goes willingly :)
- this is a mnemonic from BEC

slipstick

Crimping, using the correct crimp tool, is preferred by many organisations for electrical connections. But good crimp tools are not cheap.

Old pliers or a hammer and blunt chisel are cheap but crimping using them is not a preferred option.

Steve

wolframore

#24
Mar 25, 2019, 03:57 pm Last Edit: Mar 25, 2019, 03:59 pm by wolframore
I have something similar... they work reasonably well as long as you're not in a hurry... Perfect crimps:

$12 crimpers
Bad boys rate our young girls but Violet goes willingly :)
- this is a mnemonic from BEC

Go Up