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Topic: Ribbon Cable Tester Project [Help needed.] (Read 132 times) previous topic - next topic

ardacoder

Apr 23, 2019, 02:51 pm Last Edit: Apr 23, 2019, 03:13 pm by ardacoder
Hello, I have been working on a project. It's a ribbon cable tester up to 40 pins. So I will need 40 inputs and 40 outputs. I will compare inputs' and outputs' state to test if the cable works. How can I achieve this? I guess I am going to need some shift registers and multiplexers. If so, which IC's do I need to use?

Robin2

I won't use an arduino
So why are you asking your question on the Arduino Forum?

Seems a bit cheeky if you are not using an Arduino product.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

ardacoder


adwsystems

#3
Apr 23, 2019, 03:26 pm Last Edit: Apr 23, 2019, 03:27 pm by adwsystems
PCF8575 - 16 I/O each. Use 6
PCF8574 - 8 I/O each. use 10

Set one as output set rest to input. You should have only 2 pins read one, more or less then fail.

 

Paul_KD7HB

Hello, I have been working on a project. It's a ribbon cable tester up to 40 pins. So I will need 40 inputs and 40 outputs. I will compare inputs' and outputs' state to test if the cable works. How can I achieve this? I guess I am going to need some shift registers and multiplexers. If so, which IC's do I need to use?
When you write "pins", I guess your cable has insulation displacement connectors. They cannot short two wires, so you are only concerned with continuity.

We had an order for similar cable a few years ago. I built a simple tester with 40 red LEDs and 40 resistors in series, powered by a 12 volt psu. If a LED lit, the pin to pin continuity as there. Easy to check all LEDs at once by eye ball. No Arduino needed.

The customer even bought the test box!

Paul

Slumpert

Cheaper tester would be to simply have voltage go down one pin, feed back via next pin and repeat.

You just need a single LED, coin cell ,  2 40pin connectors and a bunch of solder jumps to test if the whole cable is okay.



Robin2

Cheaper tester would be to simply have voltage go down one pin, feed back via next pin and repeat.
That won't tell you which wire is faulty or show up a short-circuit between wires

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

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