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Topic: First project - automated mushroom fruiting chamber (Read 179 times) previous topic - next topic

qQUINNn

Howdy folks!

I'm a hobby mushroom grower for edibles - lionsmane, shiitake, oysters, winecaps - and am interested in using arduino to develop an automated humidity/fresh air exchange system for a very small container. This will be a trial run for feasibility before moving on up to larger and larger greenhouses. Also a trial run for programming as I've never programmed anything independently before.

The setup I have now is straightforward: a shotgun fruiting chamber (SGFC) with a fluorescent light on a timer that's plugged into a wall outlet (SGFC attachment).

Drawbacks of this setup: in order to maintain humidity and fresh air circulation, I'm having to manually go into the tank several times a day to mist the cakes and fan fresh air. The more often I can do this the greater the yield will be. But I've got things to do, places to be! I can't be sitting around misting and fanning all day long.

Ideally, I'd like to have an arduino system that looks something like this (SGFC_auto) attachment. Light runs on a 12h on/off cycle, and the mister and fan run for 5-10 minutes every hour during the light cycle.

Pump I'd have is this guy, placed into a rainwater reservoir (shrooms don't like tap water, who knew!) connected to a mister mounted on the side of the SGFC:
https://www.amazon.com/BQLZR-3-5V-6V-Submersible-Aquarium-Fountain/dp/B00EQ1ZR7A

nozzle: https://www.rainbird.com/products/xeri-sprays-and-misters

Fan would just be a 5V computer fan.

These are my questions:

1. Can I drive a 120V, 15W fluorescent bulb off of an arduino, or do I leave it connected to the outlet timer?

2. Where can I go to learn about how to program the pump and fan to work?

3. If I choose to add this functionality, what are the best (read: cheapest) ways to monitor humidity and CO2?

Thank you so much for reading and considering - I look forward to reading any sage wisdom you might have! Even if it's RTFM, n00b XD

DrDiettrich

Search the forum for "greenhouse" projects. Basic coding is not overly complicated, it's the hardware that deserves special considerations.

For all external devices (sensors, humidity, light...) specialized driver modules are required. Many even unexpensive offers are available, it's up to you to find what you need.

dave-in-nj

#2
Apr 18, 2019, 12:05 pm Last Edit: Apr 18, 2019, 12:06 pm by dave-in-nj


 second :


dave-in-nj

Quote
3. If I choose to add this functionality, what are the best (read: cheapest) ways to monitor humidity and CO2?
it could be said that quality costs money,  what type of quality do you want ?

if you use cheap sensors you might be able to get a system that works well, almost all the time.
have  you heard of the Boeing 777-MAX  MCAS  unit that relied on one sensor ?

I would highly recomened that you do start with the simple stuff, but learn to read the data sheets.
the humidity for mushrooms is near condensing and some data sheets show drop off of accuracy and life expectancy if run saturated or near saturated.   opening the door to the unit can run humidity well past the dew point in the warm, moist environmental chambers you need.

what you are asking is a great first project because 80% of what you want is well documented and easy to find the parts.
 there may be sites for arduin mushroom farmers so you might find riches there.

as a note about misting.  that takes pressure to atomize the droplets, again, cheap misters have almost no QC in manufacturing, and quality parts cost much-much more.
to mist, you need a high pressure, and then the mistors.
for high humidity you can use an ultrasonic humidifier.  might be much easier to use.



qQUINNn



it could be said that quality costs money,  what type of quality do you want ?

if you use cheap sensors you might be able to get a system that works well, almost all the time.
have  you heard of the Boeing 777-MAX  MCAS  unit that relied on one sensor ?

I would highly recomened that you do start with the simple stuff, but learn to read the data sheets.
the humidity for mushrooms is near condensing and some data sheets show drop off of accuracy and life expectancy if run saturated or near saturated.   opening the door to the unit can run humidity well past the dew point in the warm, moist environmental chambers you need.

what you are asking is a great first project because 80% of what you want is well documented and easy to find the parts.
 there may be sites for arduin mushroom farmers so you might find riches there.

as a note about misting.  that takes pressure to atomize the droplets, again, cheap misters have almost no QC in manufacturing, and quality parts cost much-much more.
to mist, you need a high pressure, and then the mistors.
for high humidity you can use an ultrasonic humidifier.  might be much easier to use.
Dave, that's great advice about the misting, I think an ultrasonic humidifier would be a much better choice - I'm thinking something along the lines of what's presented in this tutorial:

https://create.arduino.cc/projecthub/taifur/smart-humidifier-dac66f

I'll need some help when it comes to expanding the functionality - I'd like to add a fan as well as a timer.

In terms of adding a 5V fan, are there specific parameters I should be looking for to make sure that it's arduino compatible?

I imagine the board itself will be on the outside of the chamber, and the sensing/responding electronics will sit on the inside. Hopefully they'll survive the moist environments no problem.

Search the forum for "greenhouse" projects. Basic coding is not overly complicated, it's the hardware that deserves special considerations.

For all external devices (sensors, humidity, light...) specialized driver modules are required. Many even unexpensive offers are available, it's up to you to find what you need.
Doc, for a 5V computer fan driven by the arduino, what kind of driver module are we talking?

Thanks to both of you for taking the time to reply!

bluejets

#5
Apr 29, 2019, 12:56 am Last Edit: Apr 29, 2019, 12:57 am by bluejets
This will be a trial run for feasibility before moving on up to larger and larger greenhouses.

Something you may not be aware of but last trip to Thailand NE I saw several mushroom growing "greenhouses" and not a drop of power or Arduino in sight, all natural heat, convection etc.etc.

Are you trying to grow them in the snow somewhere?

dave-in-nj

Something you may not be aware of but last trip to Thailand NE I saw several mushroom growing "greenhouses" and not a drop of power or Arduino in sight, all natural heat, convection etc.etc.

Are you trying to grow them in the snow somewhere?
sometimes we have to wonder how people could hunt without telescopic sights
or grow food without data monitoring and automatic sprinklers.
in reality,  the food will grow,
seedlings like 82 F degree environments.
they will grow on your kitchen table at 65 F degrees, but double production at 82 F
farmers are always trying to see what happens if they add more N or P in their fertilizer.
in the mushroom farms I have been in (Kennett Square Pennsylvania, the self proclaimed mushroom capitol)
the walls were block, the lights were poor and the humidity was horrible.(for humans)
their concern was the slug of air entering with each door open/close cycle.  that slug of air effected the crop significantly enough that they crops near the doors did not do nearly as well as the ones without the effects.
All the farmers I know would do whatever was needed to plant early and get more harvest per acre.

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