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Topic: Choosing the right NPN Transistor (Read 201 times) previous topic - next topic

BartArien

Hi,

I am having trouble choosing the right NPN transistor. I want to turn on a LCD display with voltage of 5v and current of 150 mA).
The arduino output pin is 5v with max current of 15mA so i figured out the best way is use a NPN transistor but how do i choose the right one?

Can i use for example a NPN C1815 with a voltage of 50 and current of 150?

Regards
Bart

larryd

#1
Apr 17, 2019, 10:14 pm Last Edit: Apr 17, 2019, 10:15 pm by larryd
Use a P channel MOSFET high side switch.
Or
You could use a low current relay driven by your transistor.

https://www.jameco.com/z/NA-5W-K-Fujitsu-5-Volt-178-Ohm-Double-Pole-Double-Throw-Relay_2202360.html 






No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

Paul__B

The right NPN transistor is usually a FET.  :smiley-lol:

But an NPN transistor or N-channel FET must switch the low - cathode - side of your LCD display illumination (the LED itself, not the display driver).

You need to explain what display you are using, and how you propose to connect this.

TimChPi

Hey:
MOSFET act as a switch, where commonly seen NMOS act as a grounding switch - When it is off, the component floats, hence no voltage difference and it is off. When it is on, the component is grounded on GND, therefore creating a voltage difference for the component to be turned on.
So I suppose you can connect everything you want to connect to ground in the LCD to the drain of the mosfet, and use a arduino to turn it on and off.
But if you mean NPN transistors ... there are heaps, to be honest. A good way I usually go when I am finding components is go on the website of a company called RS and use filter to search for desired part.
Hope this helps
Cheers

wvmarle

Switching a display off while the signal lines are still driven can give very nasty effects, including broken I/O pins (on both the display and the Arduino trying to control it). That's something to be aware of.

Many devices have an "enable" pin, which if available should be used instead.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

Paul__B

Well, if he ever comes back to explain what he is trying to do (read as: XY problem), we could help him, but it may be just another "one-hit wonder".  :smiley-roll:

Otherwise not worth talking to /dev/null.  :smiley-eek:

BartArien

Trying to avoid the xy problem as Paul mentoined I will try to restate the base question:

 "How to choose the right transistor for controlling object A (which uses more current) through a GPIO  (which can give less current).

I have done some research about the principles of transistors but I am missing some basic info i guess.

If someone knows  a good basic tutorials, please share.

wvmarle

You probably need a PNP one. Or p-channel MOSFET. For high-side switching. Depending on the actual voltages you switch,  you may ALSO need an NPN one.

Which type you need depends on:
- the current switched (you mentioned 150 mA).
- the voltage switched (you mentioned 5V, I assume DC).
- the actual device that's switched (an LCD display, type unspecified).
- high or low side switching, largely dependent on what is being switched, and sometimes on why and when it's being switched.
- what other connections that device has with the rest of the projects (unspecified; presumably data connections as it's an LCD display).

Step 1: decide HOW you're going to switch it (high or low side), and what type of transistor you want to use (BJT or MOSFET usually).
Step 2: open your parts box and see if you have anything that fits the bill.
Step 3: search for suitable part, using e.g. the parts selector of Digikey.
When you settle on a specific part, check the data sheet to see if it really is suitable.

And, as I mentioned already, if that device has an enable pin, that's normally the best way of powering it down.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

Wawa

#8
Today at 12:01 am Last Edit: Today at 12:03 am by Wawa
WHY do you want to switch an LCD display off.
Current draw?
The LED behind the LCD probably uses most of it, so why not just switch the LED off.
The (unspecified) LCD could already have a LED transistor switch buildin.
Leo..

JohnRob

Quote
"How to choose the right transistor for controlling object A (which uses more current) through a GPIO  (which can give less current).
As you have likely read, the in general most folks find an MosFet a more desirable choice than a BJT (transistor).  Why....

  • A Mosfet can mimic a switch to ground with lower voltage across it when on than a transistor.
  • A Mosfet takes nearly no current to control, where as a transistor used as a switch required ~ 1/10 of the current being controlled to be provided from the ┬ÁP output pin.



So to answer your question, you start with the requirements:

1) how much current do you wish to control.  This will help chose a specific part.
2) are you trying to switch to ground or to +V
3) If trying to switch to +V, is the voltage you are trying to control higher than the arduino voltage?




Please do not PM me with thread based messages.  If your thoughts are worth responding,  the group should benefit from your insight.

Paul__B

Trying to avoid the xy problem as Paul mentoined I will try to restate the base question:

 "How to choose the right transistor for controlling object A (which uses more current) through a GPIO  (which can give less current).
So you are making the problem worse by wanting to generalise.  :smiley-roll:

Start by answering Wawa's questions, and give us Web links to the display you have.

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