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Topic: Smart Switch (Read 258 times) previous topic - next topic

YaaqobhPT

Apr 20, 2019, 02:04 am Last Edit: Apr 20, 2019, 02:09 am by YaaqobhPT
Hello everyone!
I need to make a smart switch so I am seaching some options.
The project is: with a remote control via IR the arduino will capture the signal and open or close the circuit between the eletrical grid(220v) and a power supply (like this -> https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/10w-400w-All-series-parameter-can_60601688348.html?spm=a2700.7724857.normalList.41.19b37031I7Jf3z)(will be between 50-600w).
I seach and I found this -> Arduino-controlled-plug-to-plug-switch, but after that I read that I shoud use an solid state relay instead a normal relay, because the user maybe would open and close the circuit a lot of times.
What shoud I do?

Thank you for your time!

YaaqobhPT

MorganS

Use a relay. That Instructable seems better than most others.

That kind of power supply will have a very high inrush current when it's switched on. Make sure whatever relay you buy has a lot more amps than the power supply does.
"The problem is in the code you didn't post."

YaaqobhPT

Use a relay. That Instructable seems better than most others.

That kind of power supply will have a very high inrush current when it's switched on. Make sure whatever relay you buy has a lot more amps than the power supply does.
How I know the inrust corrent?
After all that will not be a powersuplly, will be a transformer because will be ac to ac

Paul__B

How I know the inrush corrent?
Assume it is five to ten times the rated current.

After all that will not be a power supply, will be a transformer because will be ac to ac
What you cited is a switchmode power supply with a high inrush current.  Better ones have a NTC thermistor to limit this, but they tend to have a significant failure rate.

YaaqobhPT

Better ones have a NTC thermistor to limit this, but they tend to have a significant failure rate.

Why should I get a NTC thermistor?

MorganS

Unless you are a power supply engineer, then no.
"The problem is in the code you didn't post."

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