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Topic: barcode scanner (Read 229 times) previous topic - next topic

geofmen

hi everyone..
im trying to use zebra ls1203 barcode scanner to arduino..
it is possible?
without using usb shield..

david_2018

Looks like that scanner has an rs232 interface, if you can get the correct cable.

jremington

To use that scanner with Arduino, you will need an RS232 cable and this RS232 adapter (or similar).

Software serial does not work at high Baud rates, so you may have to use an Arduino Mega or Pro Micro, which have extra hardware serial ports.

Hiddenvision

#3
Sep 09, 2019, 09:07 pm Last Edit: Sep 09, 2019, 09:09 pm by Hiddenvision
If you pop the lid off you will find the TTL data lines if I remember right.
then it should be just serial data.
I'd suspect it is just running at 9600 so even the soft serial should cope.

I could be wrong.

jremington

#4
Sep 10, 2019, 12:29 am Last Edit: Sep 10, 2019, 12:36 am by jremington
Quote
I could be wrong
You could look at the actual specs, scroll down to chapter 6 for the specs on the RS232 interface (one of three possible interfaces).

Hiddenvision

Um, not much mention of Arduinos in the specs.
Plus it does not show much of the internals so can't tell where the pinouts for the data will be.

But hey if a picture or two is posted of the internals that will help.

I guess it should be asked,,
 is this just a one off project or do you need something that will plug and play without mods.?

Hiddenvision

Ahh, page 37 shows the pinouts of the 10pin.

I wonder if those pins are RS232 levels or if they are TTL.
 

jremington

#7
Sep 10, 2019, 01:19 am Last Edit: Sep 10, 2019, 01:50 am by jremington
I think the safest assumption is that those pins (which have multiple different functions), when used with the RS-232 interface adapter, would be for connection to computers with genuine RS-232 serial ports, with +/- 5 to 12 V levels, inverted logic.

It makes no sense to dismantle and hack such an expensive scanner, when a simple RS-232 level adapter like that linked in reply #2 is more or less guaranteed to work.

Hiddenvision

#8
Sep 10, 2019, 02:28 am Last Edit: Sep 10, 2019, 02:38 am by Hiddenvision
100% agree,
If they have the correct 10 pin connection cable then it is simple.
But if they don't then the cover should be removable.
Once your inside fair chance you will find a max232 doing the RS232 conversion if it is not in the other end of the 232 cable.
Just saying that the data pins suitable for *direct connection to Arduino will be in there somewhere, knocking out the need of more hardware  ** as long as the levels are right.

Otherwise like you say something like this will flip the 232 back to TTL ready for Arduino.
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/MAX3232-RS232-to-TTL-Serial-Port-Converter-Module-Male-or-Female-DB9-D-Sub/263286469667

You could be crazy and use an ESP wifi module internally, add a lipo cell with 5v charge/boost board and you could have yourself something cordless that can interact with all sorts of interfaces.

REMEMBER: ESP max voltage is 3.3v (use level convertors on data pins as needed)

TriB

You could be crazy and use an ESP wifi module internally, add a lipo cell with 5v charge/boost board and you could have yourself something cordless that can interact with all sorts of interfaces.
Or buy a Bluetooth or WiFi barcodescanner for the half of the price of this zebra scanner ;)

I´d rather by a 9$ scanner to disassable and connect it to an arduino, then screwing a 60-70 bucks device.
Or buy an USB Host shield for 4$  ;D

jremington

#10
Sep 10, 2019, 05:31 pm Last Edit: Sep 10, 2019, 05:33 pm by jremington
Yes, you could sell the Zebra scanner, buy a cheaper one to hack, and have enough left for dinner for two.

Hiddenvision


Maybe they need the quality of the expensive scanner but the flexibility of alternate connectivity.

Who knows such things, the OP has long gone..


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