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Topic: Has anybody seen these nice "doughnuts" for easy soldering? (Read 11619 times) previous topic - next topic

CrossRoads

You can obtain boards with the same layout. For example,
PROTO777
http://www.futurlec.com/ProtoBoards.shtml#PROTO777
looks like two solderless breadboards next to each other.

Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

westfw

Definitely get a "modified wrap" tool.  It puts a turn or so of insulated wire around the post as well as the N turns of bare wire, which makes for significantly more physically robust boards, when you're all done (especially since the "edge" of the insulated part may be a physical weak point in the wired, if your stripping of insulation wasn't perfect...)

I remember when the OKI tool was about $10.  $30 is ridiculous :-(

I used to wirewrap.  Doing passive components is annoying.  SMT anything is nearly impossible.  Nowdays, you can get a PCB made for the price of the sockets and adapters and such for a moderate sized project.

On the plus side, a WW socket strip on something like an Arduino Bare Bones Board gives you both 'plug into a protoboard' on the bottom and "plug in wires" on the top...

Osgeld

#32
Apr 08, 2012, 02:32 am Last Edit: Apr 08, 2012, 02:34 am by Osgeld Reason: 1
one thing I do is wrap directly to leads, and then follow up with solder so it will actually hold. soldering ribbon cable just got a ton easier (most of it is the right size to fit in the tools) without expensive crimpers, and dead bugs are stupid easy



its still a ton easier and quicker than trying to manually hold the component, wire and solder it since the wire is already wrapped around the leads

(yea thats cellophane tape on cardboard, totally ESD safe)
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

CrossRoads

Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

bibre

Just curiosity, but what do you do with that circuit on the cardboard?

Osgeld

#35
Apr 08, 2012, 03:31 am Last Edit: Apr 08, 2012, 04:37 am by Osgeld Reason: 1
its a 6x9 inch 7 segment display made out of hot melt glue sticks

http://hackaday.com/2011/08/25/large-7-segment-display-made-from-glue/

PS: and yes I have been to Monterrey, but it was like 20 years ago when I was 10 or so heh
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

bibre

#36
Apr 08, 2012, 06:36 am Last Edit: Apr 08, 2012, 06:38 am by bibre Reason: 1
Clever and CREATIVE !   8)

Well, looking forward to meeting you if you come back here, but please ... don't bring your 7 segment digit because it'll melt at 42 ÂșC in the shade, he, he.   :D

terryking228

Quote
@Terry, Pin D3 is connected to Vcc, Pin D8 is connected to ground. D being the 4th strip, 3rd & 8th holes.


CrossRoads Strikes Again!

Were you at IBM also, or just OverLogical...??   This was a mantra that those of us who prototyped lots of boards at IBM repeated in our sleep. Along with the "Ziiip" of the electric WireWrap gun. I still have a nice one, which is a luxury any more.

Robert, I think I have your NewEngland address. It'll be a little while before I have that WW stuff in stock..


Quote
I'd like boards that have the same layout as the solderless breadboards, so we can transfer right over.

Yes!! I have to find those at a good price....


Quote
Definitely get a "modified wrap" tool.  It puts a turn or so of insulated wire around the post as well as the N turns of bare wire, which makes for significantly more physically robust boards, when you're all done (especially since the "edge" of the insulated part may be a physical weak point in the wired, if your stripping of insulation wasn't perfect...)
I remember when the OKI tool was about $10.  $30 is ridiculous :-(

Look at an electric WireWrap tool now: $250, and the BIT?? another $150 or so... I'll guard mine  :)

Thanks for all the good ideas!
Regards, Terry King terry@yourduino.com  - Check great prices, devices and Arduino-related boards at http://YourDuino.com
HOW-TO: http://ArduinoInfo.Info

CrossRoads

#38
Apr 08, 2012, 08:32 am Last Edit: Apr 08, 2012, 08:38 am by CrossRoads Reason: 1
Was not at IBM, just built a lot of stuff over time.
One of the fun things I did as a co-op at DEC (Digital Equipment Corp, now gone) was working with 10K and 100K ECL (emitter coupled logic) and using Time Domain Reflectrometry to measure signal lengths and reflections and terminations. And later a summer job at Teradyne writing test vectors for MSI & LSI chips. And finally several years at Raytheon designing high speed memory cards. Most complex one was 85-90 surface mount chips on 16 layer cards mounted back to back on thick copper plates for cooling, with crossover connector on top and even more pins on the bottom to connect to the backplane. My controller card managed 8 memory cards, and did 8-16-32-64 bit transfers with the rest of the system, with spare rows of memory and spare colums of memory for swapping out failed rows or columns as a demonstration, and 64/72 BIT EDAC for corrections of 1 and 2 bit transient upsets. 68020 processor just to initialize the memory on system startup.
Fun times.


Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

Osgeld

#39
Apr 08, 2012, 09:26 am Last Edit: Apr 08, 2012, 09:40 am by Osgeld Reason: 1
yea.. well ... we make led lighting systems as a subsystem supplier for car companies ...

:smiley-roll:

i got to use a flip flop in a design once
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

BillO



I'd like boards that have the same layout as the solderless breadboards, so we can transfer right over.


The boards I linked to before have a layout that is like 4 small solderless breadboards.  The also have double sided power buses in 2 zones, plated through holes, 2 power supply circuits, beakout's for LEDs, various connectors, momentary switches, all sorts of header and terminal areas.

phoenixcomm

wah, make it harder please:
question: Dog Three is VCC  and Dog Eight is Ground
Dog Three is D3 in hex = 16
Dog Eight is D8 in hex = 21

but I would hate to hook up a ic to it.. POOF!

Cris H.

you can keep the 'tool' I much prefer my Gardner Denver Power Wrap tools

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