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Topic: Is there any difference between Arduino Uno Revision 3, and Arduino Uno SMD? (Read 6260 times) previous topic - next topic

SarahC

Hi!

I've been using the Texas Instruments F2013 for a while now, and it's great for small circuits - http://sarahs-muse.livejournal.com/1343114.html

But I've started to extend my peripherals, and found most of the LCD panels/matrix displays don't run on 3 volts, but on 5 (I'm not good enough to do a solid interface for that - and a test board I set up for one without the chip didn't even work), also having only 8 GPIO is a bit limiting.
The 14 GPIO 5 volt pins, and 5 ADC that are on the Uno look perfect for my panels, and the USB connection for HID components to the PC looks fun.

I want to get the most up to date board when I purchase an Arduino, and I've found it is the Revision 3 version.
There's also the surface mount chip version - is this the same as the revision 3 - but with a different packaging for the chip, or is it based on revision 1 or 2?

http://www.sparkfun.com/products/10356

http://www.sparkfun.com/products/11021

Many thanks!   :)

cmiyc

The SMD version was originally a stop-gap when there was a shortage of DIP ATmega328s.

That's the only major difference.  If you can't spot the differences, then they don't matter...
Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com


elindon

I am about to start manufacturing and I am looking for a board to handle the computation.  I have never programmed with these boards before and I want to know why should I spend a dollar or two more on the UNO R3 instead of the UNO R3 SMD?  Basically the same question as before, but an answer that tells me a little more would be helpful.  I appreciate your reply James, I guess I'm a little more curious than the OP.

retrolefty


I am about to start manufacturing and I am looking for a board to handle the computation.  I have never programmed with these boards before and I want to know why should I spend a dollar or two more on the UNO R3 instead of the UNO R3 SMD?  Basically the same question as before, but an answer that tells me a little more would be helpful.  I appreciate your reply James, I guess I'm a little more curious than the OP.


It's normally recommended to beginners to use the normal (DIP chip) Uno over the SMD version in that it allows a user to easily replace the AVR chip if he/she damages it. Replacing a SMD chip is not a simple task and requires special tools, knowledge, and experience. As James said there would probably not even be a SMD Uno board if it wasn't for a world wide shortage of 328P DIPs when they first released the board.

Lefty

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