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Topic: geiger tube schematic, help with components sourcing? (Read 8282 times) previous topic - next topic

wanderson

I still have my X-Ray machine somewhere I built from the same Amateur Scientist column.  For mine I used a neon sign transformer from an earlier tesla coil...

I do miss the old Amateur Scientist column...

flamturpolt


Given that you are just looking to test fiestaware you may want to consider a spinthariscope rather than jury rigging your own geiger counter.  They don't need batteries, and provide a visual indication of radioactivity.  And they meet one other of your requirements--they are cheap.

http://unitednuclear.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=2_12


Well, a Spinthariscope needs total darkness for I think about ten minutes. Something that is not possible in an antique store.

Docedison

No it's 10 minutes for your eyes to adjust...
I tried to buy the cd... of all the columns, had it once and loved it... there are 3 available through amazon across the US...@ $183.00 ea... Used only.

Doc
--> WA7EMS <--
"The solution of every problem is another problem." -Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
I do answer technical questions PM'd to me with whatever is in my clipboard

wanderson

For those prices you would be better off purchasing CL Stongs book.  Granted it doesn't contain the latter columns, but those weren't as good since they got watered down by the safety police...

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B000ICZI3Y/ref=dp_olp_0?ie=UTF8&condition=all

wanderson



Given that you are just looking to test fiestaware you may want to consider a spinthariscope rather than jury rigging your own geiger counter.  They don't need batteries, and provide a visual indication of radioactivity.  And they meet one other of your requirements--they are cheap.

http://unitednuclear.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=2_12


Well, a Spinthariscope needs total darkness for I think about ten minutes. Something that is not possible in an antique store.


Not in my experience, I have used them indoors in daylight.  Granted the dark it is the better the show!

BulletMagnet83

It's quite possible to get over 1kV (if you wanted to) out of a modified disposable camera flash circuit. I've done it myself and once you know how it's pretty easy to build the circuit from scratch. As you won't be discharging massive pulses from giant capacitors, there's pretty much no chance of you seriously hurting yourself anyway - you can grab the output wires and while it won't be very nice, it's not going to do you any real harm. The poor thing can't supply a lot of current anyway before the transistor gives up and dies.

wanderson


... there's pretty much no chance of you seriously hurting yourself anyway ...


While the odds of serious injury are relatively small, there is a reasonable and distinct possibility of serious (up to and including lethal) harm when working with such circuits.  Working with high voltage circuits deserve caution and most importantly a lot of reading before hand.  If someone doesn't understand how the circuit in question works, they are much more likely to hurt themselves.

I'm all for building stuff from scratch, if your primary goal is learning about how such things work; however, if the primary goal is to use the device it only makes financial sense if you have a fair bit of experience both in constructing circuits as well as in understanding how they work.  If you don't you will almost certainly spend more money (not even counting the time involved) getting a working device that even then will not perform as well as what you could have purchased...

BulletMagnet83



While the odds of serious injury are relatively small, there is a reasonable and distinct possibility of serious (up to and including lethal) harm when working with such circuits.  Working with high voltage circuits deserve caution and most importantly a lot of reading before hand.  If someone doesn't understand how the circuit in question works, they are much more likely to hurt themselves.



Well I wouldn't ADVISE anyone grabs the HV output on purpose, of course! Just saying that it's not particularly dangerous compared to discharging a capacitor into yourself or coming into contact with live mains wiring. I'm sure we could all debate the relative dangers of these little HV inverters til we're blue in the face, but I think the absolute worst you'd get is a small burn. I'd compare it to a stinging, tingling sensation rather than a full-on electric shock, and I've had a fair few... I tend not to worry that much about tiny battery powered things if there's no beefy capacitors involved.

In my humble opinion the greatest danger of injury is indirect - jerking your hand away suddenly and hitting it against something hot or sharp. If you play with HV, sooner or later it's going to happen. You can minimise the risk with some PPE but it's all part of the learning process :D

flamturpolt

I researched Elektor's photo-diode kit. It seems pretty cool. Has anyone ever bought this kit? It is in my price range.

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