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Topic: A common language? (Read 6703 times) previous topic - next topic

GordonEndersby



We used to wind up the septics with British slang all the time when they visited from the US office.
Rhyming slang, septics = septic tanks = yanks.
US, we referred to the Un Serviceable office.

They got very wound up when one the girls slapped one of the Helpdesk guys on his backside when he was under her desk. The visiting US girl actually reported the British girl for sexual harassment.
They couldnt understand what was going on when we would start a conversation by slagging each other off, jokeingly, before we got down to business.
It usually took at least 6 months till we broke them in to a British sense of humour.


Gordon

Guyt54

Best UK joke I heard this week.

(Ireland prime minister on the economic measures)

"Well, we have good feedback from UK and US, all we are waiting for is the response from U2"


simon.monk

In the UK, both 'spastic' and 'cripple' are pretty unacceptable.

So much so, that its a struggle to write them here.

Its almost as disrespectful as the N word to refer to someone who is black.

I was shocked when my nephew who has lived in the US most of his life, introduced us to his cat called 'Spaz'!
--
I write books about Arduino and Electronics: http://simonmonk.org

biocow

@gordon

Hope you don't think everyone in the US is that stogy. If you could only sit in on one of our meetings. The VP (yes, Vice President) of our department takes pot shots at us and keeps score on a white board. Of course we do our best to do the same and he'll put our name up and keep score as well.

pwillard

#19
Dec 03, 2010, 05:41 pm Last Edit: Dec 03, 2010, 05:45 pm by pwillard Reason: 1
USA perspective

I've known more than one person who called one of their animals "SPAZ" and I'm sure they meant it in a most comical, loving and positive way.

Of course, then there are words I have no clue what they mean initially.  A coworker, originally from the UK,  says his cousins are all "chav"... I'm thinking WHAT is Chav?  Like "little shavers"?  I have no clue.  

Then he says: Go to HULU.com and watch a show called "Little Britain"... he says Vickey Pollard is "chav"  I'm like... oh... we have those in the US too with a different name.

I pity the Etymologists...

... and anyone trying to learn English... I mean... "which English are you learning?"

keeper63

#20
Dec 03, 2010, 06:07 pm Last Edit: Dec 03, 2010, 06:08 pm by keeper63@cox.net Reason: 1
What I find really interesting is how humans give this kind of power to certain words, and not to others.

These words, which are just a series of phonetic sounds strung together in some order, connect with patterns of ideas in our heads; in the necessary recall based on those sounds, we have this (likely socially conditioned) reaction to some words as "ok for use, some as "bad", some as "foul", and some as "offensive" - and a few that may almost be termed "never to utter".

Interestingly, few of the latter categories are filled with words relating to violence...

Can you think of a word dealing with directly with violence, that would fall into the "offensive" or "never to utter" categories? The concept (and perhaps the word) "eugenics" is almost there, but not quite.

Honestly, any word or utterance can become one of "these words", and over time, sometimes members of the categories can even fall back out. It is clearly a social contract based thing, otherwise words like "fag", which are casually used in Britain, but considered verboten (unless you are a member of the group - and even then, I think, only used in certain ways - there are other words used this way, too, as a means of division "us vs them", of course, that humans are so fond of) in the US - would be commonly thought of as "verboten" in some manner.

Humans are funny creatures who at times, take themselves waaay too seriously (and at other times, when there is real harm of life, limb, and existence - not seriously enough - ahem, START treaty, anyone?)...
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

mowcius

Quote
which English are you learning?

Well it's not just english english and american english either.

Even moving around the country you can hear people say things that you have no idea what they mean!

I suppose this is the same with many many other languages though. If you go to France and then go to a French speaking country, there will be many differences in the language.

Quote
Honestly, any word or utterance can become one of "these words", and over time, sometimes members of the categories can even fall back out

Very true. Most 'swear words' that are referred to as such now, people 50-100 years ago would either have no idea what word you just uttered or not be able to work out why you found such a normal word so offensive!

I think even Arduino has become a bit of a rude word to use in some circles.
Perhaps we'll get 'you're such an arduino' in a few years time to refer to a programmer who uses a simplistic easy to use language instead of being a hard-core coder  ;D

Mowcius

thegeekway

Like Teacakes in Yorskhire....They're batches/rolls damnit, teacakes have raisins in ;)

keeper63

Quote
Perhaps we'll get 'you're such an arduino' in a few years time to refer to a programmer who uses a simplistic easy to use language instead of being a hard-core coder


Well - looks like you've started it now, mowcius!

On the note of the Arduino being "a simple language", I would think anyone who thinks that thinks that C/C++ is "a simple language". Sure, the system abstracts certain things out, but in the end its just a library; you might as well be miffed about having to use -any- libraries in C/C++ to get anything done in other enviroments, and proclaim that using such "crutches" somehow makes one a lesser programmer.

Personally, I think those people are daft, unless their intent is to write an operating system or something (and they might still be a bit daft to insist upon their own routines for everything); ultimately, its a form of NIMBY (not-in-my-backyard) thinking. Code reuse and standardized libraries are good things!

That's the heart of the Arduino; leveraging pre-built stuff to enable projects to be developed easier and faster. Why is it considered bad by some coders, yet these same coders would think nothing of going to a restaurant to eat (they must be poor humans, unable to hunt, kill, clean, dress, and butcher their meat, grow their vegetables, or make a fire to cook it all).

;D

Furthermore - we all know there's nothing stopping someone from using the Arduino board as a "carrier" for the ATMega and coding in AVR assembler if they wanted; yet the Arduino is still seen as a "kids toy" in many circles. It bothers me that this is so, because I see it as something waaaay more sophisticated and complex...

/threadjack over - sorry...  :-X
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

mowcius

Heh, I completely agree with you. I was just saying... :D


biocow

#25
Dec 03, 2010, 08:25 pm Last Edit: Dec 03, 2010, 08:26 pm by biocow Reason: 1
So I've been wondering something for a while and I'm sure someone here can answer this. There is a Friends episode where Ross get's married in London to a Brit. In one scene they argue and Ross give the (in U.S. anyway) "Time out" sign.



Emily (the Brit) get's even more pissed and shouts "WELL UP YOURS TOO!!!!"

Is this truth or pure entertainment?

mowcius

Still time-out sign here...

Not sure of the connection there but I don't think I have seen that friends episode or if I have then I've forgotten :P

pwillard


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