Go Down

Topic: Oscilloscope recommendations <= $300 USD  ? (Read 9029 times) previous topic - next topic

mbohn

Any opinions on the Parallax USB Scope?  I've used one off and on for a few years and have mixed opinions on it.  There are some obvious limitations, bandwidth and some others.  But I've had mixed results with it in terms of getting a reliable, meaningful, trace.  Sometimes I feel that there are grounding issues, ground loops, etc that are overwhelming the displayed trace.

BTW, thanks for the suggestions on a Tek scope.  I've found a 2215 locally on CL and will look at it tomorrow.

AlphaZeta

I have been watching Dave Jone's EEVBlog for a while and remembered seeing a oscilloscope comparison video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ev121xAt_k4) which made me convinced that a stand-alone oscilloscope is a better choice in most circumstances...

keeper63

Quote
Any opinions on the Parallax USB Scope?  I've used one off and on for a few years and have mixed opinions on it.  There are some obvious limitations, bandwidth and some others.  But I've had mixed results with it in terms of getting a reliable, meaningful, trace.  Sometimes I feel that there are grounding issues, ground loops, etc that are overwhelming the displayed trace.


Interesting. Back in 2008, I won the "$100 Workbench Challenge" contest held in Nuts and Volts magazine. The prize was the Parallax USB o-scope; I ended up getting two of them (its a long story involving an address mixup). I have yet to try either of them out, and I'm not really a fan of Parallax any more; the failure of them not supporting Linux in a meaningful way made me migrate to the Arduino. The scope I have is "windows only" (though I did find a Python script to pull the data from the scope - it just needs a GUI to make it useful).

Quote
BTW, thanks for the suggestions on a Tek scope.  I've found a 2215 locally on CL and will look at it tomorrow.


If this is your first "real" scope, you may want to save your money and go for a Rigol once you get enough saved (unless you need the scope "now" - which it sounds like you might - or this scope is priced right). The Tek scopes are nice, though. Make sure you're able to test it before you plunk down the cash; take some leads with you if you have them. Make sure the test signal is within spec and adjustment on all channels; check the focus and rotation especially.

I bought my Tek earlier this year, then later bought my Fluke Combiscope - between the amounts, I could probably add $100 or so and have gotten a Rigol (but I really love both of my scopes, so no biggie overall!).

:)
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

retrolefty

#18
Dec 27, 2010, 10:53 pm Last Edit: Dec 27, 2010, 10:55 pm by retrolefty Reason: 1
Quote
I've found a 2215 locally on CL and will look at it tomorrow.


Looking on E-bay, seems most completed sales run around $100-$200 range depending on condition and assersories included. That would be a very nice analog scope. PDF Equipment manuals can sometimes be found for free on the web and real manuals can be found on e-bay for reasonable amounts. The tek manuals cover everything you could ever need to operate, maintain and repair (complete schematics, parts list, etc) your scope. There was also a yahoo group that covered tek scopes with many experts to help solving repair problems, etc, many are/were ex tek employees. It's hard to explain the satisfaction of using these old scopes as they were made of the very highest quality and cost thousands of dollars new. Some people are very reluctant to spend good money on older electronics equipment but older tek and HP test equipment is in my opinion is an exception to the rule.

Lefty

Go Up