Go Down

Topic: Can an arduino activate 2 12 VDC linear actuators (Read 2375 times) previous topic - next topic

GHarrington44

I am using an Arduino Uno and would like to activate 2 12 VDC linear actuators. Both actuators have a 100 lb load capacity and draw 10 amps of current at full load (I don't know if that makes a difference)

Is it possible to activate these linear actuators using this arduino? I am very new to arduinos and only have experience with electronics in one of my college classes so bear with me if I am confused or do not know some of the terms you answer with. I am very interested in this and very willing to learn whatever I can.

Thanks for your input

retrolefty

A Uno board would have no problem controlling two linear actuators, but in no way would it be able to power them. External components and/or modules such as motor controllers or switching transistors and an external DC power supply rated for the voltage and total current capacity needed would be required in addition to the Uno. A link to your specific actuators would be helpful and if you are planning on just controlling them to full open or closed or wish to be able to command how far to move and then stop. This latter would require a actuator that provides a analog feedback signal showing travel position at any given time.
Lefty


JimboZA

#2
Mar 04, 2013, 04:17 pm Last Edit: Mar 04, 2013, 04:19 pm by JimboZA Reason: 1
You'll need to provide a bit more detail of how those actuators are controlled, but by and large the answer will be yes. Post a link to the maker?

Some linear actuators are actually just servos which are controlled (as opposed to powered) directly from an Arduino i/o pin (although that 12V might be a hassle); others are normal dc motors where you may need a driver chip if you want to be able to forward / reverse.

The actual voltage and current will not be supplied through the Arduino anyway.... the Arduino will merely be in charge of control- the actuators will need a power supply of the correct rating, separate from the Arduino.

HTH?

Jim

Edit.... just like Lefty said  8)


Johannesburg hams call me: ZS6JMB on Highveld rep 145.7875 (-600 & 88.5 tone)
Dr Perry Cox: "Help me to help you, help me to help you...."
Your answer may already be here: https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=384198.0

GHarrington44

Here is a link to the 12 VDC, 10 Amp linear actuator made by firgelli auto that I am referring to ...

http://www.firgelliauto.com/product_info.php?cPath=69&products_id=248

I believe it just uses a servo motor. Correct me if I am wrong, but I was reading something yesterday that said I could use some sort of relay and transistors that could convert the 5V from the arduino to 12V needed by the actuator. Is this true or would I need a separate power supply for each one?

retrolefty


Here is a link to the 12 VDC, 10 Amp linear actuator made by firgelli auto that I am referring to ...

http://www.firgelliauto.com/product_info.php?cPath=69&products_id=248

I believe it just uses a servo motor. Correct me if I am wrong, but I was reading something yesterday that said I could use some sort of relay and transistors that could convert the 5V from the arduino to 12V needed by the actuator. Is this true or would I need a separate power supply for each one?


Actually the simplest way to control that is with a DPDT relay such that you just apply 12vdc to the motor wires with the polarity you wish to move, when the actuator reaches it's end of travel built in limit switches cut off the motor until you reverse the polarity of the applied voltage where it will then move in the opposite direction until it reaches the other end of travel and is stopped by the other built in limit switch. However if you wish to be able to command the actuator to move to a specific position and stop you are going to need a 10+ amp H-drive motor driver and some kind of analog feedback sensor so your arduino can tell where the actuator position is at any given time, and of course the software code to make that all work.

So as a minimum you would need a:

5 volt coil DPDT relay with contact ratings higher then 10 amps.
A transistor to switch the relay coil on or off
A resistor to wire between an arduino output pin and the base or gate of the transistor.

Lefty

GHarrington44

If I use the relay, would the actuator be powered from the arduino or from an external power supply? and If I use a 10+ Amp H drive motor driver then does that mean the arduino is able to provide 10A to the actuator? bear with me on this since I am slowly trying to understand all this

retrolefty


If I use the relay, would the actuator be powered from the arduino or from an external power supply? and If I use a 10+ Amp H drive motor driver then does that mean the arduino is able to provide 10A to the actuator? bear with me on this since I am slowly trying to understand all this


An arduino is great at controlling stuff, it kind of sucks at trying to power stuff, That actuator (from it's datasheet) requires a separate 12vdc power supply capable of supplying in excess of 10 amps, and that is a lot of power, 120+ watts. An arduino board can provide about 400ma of +5vdc power (on a good day) from it's shield 5V pin, that's 2 watts of power, so I think you can see the answer to your question, no?

Lefty

MAS3

Don't cross post.
You asked about this on several places on this board, don't do that.

You need to use an extrenal power source.
The driver can handle 10 A.
The other components need to be capable of doing the same, but your Arduino doesn't need to as it hands this over to the driver.
It is very unlikely however that this linear motor will use that 10 A, but the driver could handle it if it  needed to.
There's nothing wrong with overdimensioning, but anything can be overdone.
Have a look at "blink without delay".
Did you connect the grounds ?
Je kunt hier ook in het Nederlands terecht: http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html

JimboZA

The Firgelli to which you linked is NOT a servo- it says on that page it's a 2-wire job with limit switches.

From what I remember from Figelli's site in the past, the actuators with the -R suffix are the servo powered ones.
Johannesburg hams call me: ZS6JMB on Highveld rep 145.7875 (-600 & 88.5 tone)
Dr Perry Cox: "Help me to help you, help me to help you...."
Your answer may already be here: https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=384198.0

GHarrington44

You're right. I actually knew it was based off a DC motor but I was reading something about servo motors when I was writing the post so that must have been where the mistake was. Thanks for letting me know.

Go Up