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Topic: Anyone Seen The Maple? (Read 39230 times) previous topic - next topic

retrolefty

#30
Jun 13, 2010, 09:32 pm Last Edit: Jun 13, 2010, 09:33 pm by retrolefty Reason: 1
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it would be a good thing if it could be extended to more powerful chips.


Again I think there is a clearly more logical growth path ahead for the Arduino platform via the Atmel Xmega series of processors. The Arm path is not a good next step IMHO for the Arduino developers to take.

Lefty

ArduinoAndy

Not to get off the main subject of the Leaf Labs ARM Maple but
I have yet to see any useful development of the Xmega
line of microcontrollers. Just maybe, the developers are going to
fight the same problems as the MIT boys did. Looks like
the MIT boys have won their battle.

Apple with their ARM Ipods, Iphones and IPads knows where the
future is ... The ARM processor.

Retrolefty you bought a Arduino Mega for $65, see what you
get for $15 less with the Maple.  ::) ::) ::)
"Never trust an Internet bully who insults and makes fun of your level of intelligence."

retrolefty

Quote
Retrolefty you bought a Arduino Mega for $65, see what you
get for $15 less with the Maple.


Actually I bought a Seeeduino Mega for $50.  ;) ;) ;) It's a better board with more features and more I/O pins.

Don't get me wrong, I will be keeping a close eye on the Maple and when I read enough positive feedback from more users I will most likely give it a try.

Lefty

pracas

Those of you looking at Primer2... its better to ditch it... Support seems to be kind of non-existent. though it packs in a lot of things at the price point, trying to do things beyond RIDE 7 and Circle OS seem to have limited support. :(

westfw

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Support seems to be kind of non-existent

Primer and Primer2 are "traditional" vendor demonstration platforms; some chips in a neat setup that is supposed to attract the interest of "real engineers" who might actually use those chips, thousands at a time, in some consumer product.  The idea that a demo platform might be useful on its own, as opposed to just being a sort of digital pheromone, has yet to really catch on with chip vendors.  As you say, "support" as seen in the arduino community, is pretty non-existent.  (oh, you can probably get support for a product design, and such support can range from incredibly valuable to useless, which is how chips live or die, but that's not really the same thing as we have here.)

This is mostly because such support is really difficult to do.  It's a sort of chicken-and-egg problem: if you have enough people with varied levels of expertise and helpfulness, they end up supporting each other.  But in order to GET enough people tor each that level, you need to have enough people providing "support" to start with.  I don't know how many people that is, but it seems to be more than the average semiconductor company assigns to a particular chip.  Look at how many near-equivalents there are for Arduino that haven't quite made it:
Atmel Butterfly, PIC USB Bitwhacker, Coldfire TowerSystem, STM32 Primer and Primer2, mBed...

ArduinoAndy

Alert ... The Maple is now available ... again.
For the ARM trailblazers, on this board, here
is your opportunity. I, myself, will wait until all
the libraries are done and completed.  8-) 8-) 8-)
"Never trust an Internet bully who insults and makes fun of your level of intelligence."

pracas

Code: [Select]
Primer and Primer2 are "traditional" vendor demonstration platforms;

West,

you got it bang on the point... i think i got desperate to try out arm and made a momentary decision...should keep away from such products in the future...

retrolefty

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should keep away from such products in the future...


I tiptoed into this hobby by finding active user forums that could give lots of opinions and their stories of success and failures with their projects and learnings. If I don't find an active and growing forum to support a given hardware/software platform, I would just mark it as not ready for prime time and move on. That's how I found the Arduino and happy I did it that way.

Lefty

ArduinoAndy

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i think i got desperate to try out arm and made a momentary decision...should keep away from such products in the future...


Don't feel bad pracas - I got burnt on the Xduino. From now on, I will let others trailblaze the ARM boards for me.
>:(
"Never trust an Internet bully who insults and makes fun of your level of intelligence."

pracas

I also ended up buying the STM Discover. Yet to try it as it has no support for linux.

westfw

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it as it has no support for linux.

I have to admit that multiple host operating systems was one of the first things that attracted me to Arduino.  I mean, it's POSSIBLE to do PIC and AVR development on Mac/etc, given virtual box this and Wine that and Fink the third thing and fiddle with the source to the fourth thing till it compiles, and maybe MacPort the other thing.  But it was annoyingly ... annoying.
Arduino was trivial; even pleasant.

I haven't quite figured out why the Arduino environment hasn't become the sort-of-linux for small microcontrollers.  (linux is great for vendors of larger CPU.  Do a little bit of work and you get to demo a whole operating system, without having to license or agree to much of anything.)   I guess gcc is a pretty high bar, and arduino doesn't really show off an individual products capabilities that well.  But still; the landscape includes many architectures that already have gcc support (ARM being the big example, but also PIC32 (MIPS), MSP430, Coldfire, and some of those Renesas H8 chips.)   Maybe in another couple of years.

pracas

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Do a little bit of work and you get to demo a whole operating system, without having to license or agree to much of anything.


True. The MS licenses are annoying. I think linux is the way for the future with people realizing that they can get for free almost all of what they are currently paying for. As for why arduino has not become the linux for small mcus, i think its more to do with the ego of developers who believe that something thats easy for the beginner is not good for real-time development.. i feel more that way after reading the arduino haters on this post..

http://hackaday.com/2009/11/23/stm8s-discovery-microcontrollers-reach-a-new-low/

People just dont realise that they are falling victim to corporate monopoly at times.

jabber

If anybody else fancies a look at the STM discover board, the compiler is now 32k limit not 16k, and the board is available for £5.25 in the UK from Farnell. A knee jerk reaction from ST prompted by the success of the Arduino maybe?

pracas

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A knee jerk reaction from ST prompted by the success of the Arduino maybe?
Well ST seems to be eying the students / institutional market in a futuristic manner. But it would take a lot to repeat anything like the arduino... lets see how it comes out.

ArduinoAndy

The Batman has capitulated and put an order in for the Leaflab's Maple.

I see that the  German ARM trailblazer "Starbug" is giving the Leaflab Maple leaf blowers
some hard hitting questions on their forum. From what I can see, his hardware problem on the Maple
(faulty / intermittent pushbutton switches) is fixed.

Tell, you all, how it goes...
;) ;) ;)  
"Never trust an Internet bully who insults and makes fun of your level of intelligence."

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