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Topic: My Arduino Nano decided to stop working? (Read 8060 times) previous topic - next topic

Jumbosize


OK


Yes I saw your first post Runaway Pancake and I guess you didn't see my response where I said I wasn't sure what you were asking...


Well, given --


DVDdoug:
I'm not really sure what you're trying to say... I see the portion of the schematic your referring to but what am I supposed to do with this? Sorry...

I'm not DVDdoug, so I jumped right over that.




My apologies, I meant to put your name.

Well I am now home but I can't seem to find my multimeter anywhere... I guess we'll have to put this endeavor on hold until I find it. Unless somebody else has advice.

I'd like to thank everybody who has given me feedback so far, I really appreciate it!

Jumbosize

Alright, so I found my multimeter and tested as suggested. There did not appear to be 5V present so I suppose the diode is indeed shot.

Now I guess my question is what could have caused that to happen? It literally just happened out of nowhere while it was plugged into my computer.

runaway_pancake

Diode failure -- Too much current through the diode, as exceeding the PIV was more unlikely.
Easy enough to replace.

You'd have to post a complete schematic of your project for someone to be able to point out a specific (likely) cause.
"Who is like unto the beast? who is able to make war with him?"
When all else fails, check your wiring!

0VV0

It happened to me too.
I was just testing an lcd 16x2 hooked on a I2C bus to the nano.
Could the lcd backligth fried the diode ?


Zapro


It happened to me too.
I was just testing an lcd 16x2 hooked on a I2C bus to the nano.


Could the lcd backligth fried the diode ?


Yes, very much so!

// Per.

Max198

I've got almost the same trouble but the voltage at "5V" pin is about 1.4V
I was just testing a simple sketch and then, after connecting a resistor, it switched off.

outsider

How are you powering the Nano? What is connected to the OUTPUT pins and the 5V pin? post a wiring diagram.

Max198

Power from USB
There is a led connected to OUTPUT pin and nothing at +5V pin

Paul__B

If you connect a plain LED between an output pin and either ground or 5 V, you will get a very bright but short lived LED with significantly less than 5 V across it, and may damage the Arduino.

If you think otherwise, better make a decent effort at describing what you are actually doing.

Max198

If you connect a plain LED between an output pin and either ground or 5 V, you will get a very bright but short lived LED with significantly less than 5 V across it, and may damage the Arduino.

If you think otherwise, better make a decent effort at describing what you are actually doing.
The led is connected through a resistor

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