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Topic: Want to hear some experiences with non-original Arduino's.... (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

kimkash

Hi all!
I'm new to Arduino and I've started to collect electronics in order to start my first projects (have a lot of them ;)) and I'm looking to buy Arduino Mega 2560 R3.
I found some pretty cheap boards for 40 USD that look very good with very good seller rating but i know they're aren't original Italian-made Arduino's. I'd like to hear some experiences from people who bought (probably Chinese) imitations and copycats of Arduino and had bad experiences with them.The guy who's helping me said it has some problems from time to time and i want to know how frequent and significat are they,and from that i will deduce if it's worth the price differences (which is pretty big...)

thank you all for helping!
btw that's the one I've found:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/330923480010?var=540177228476&ssPageName=STRK:MESINDXX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1436.l2649

Dolev

Grumpy_Mike

Irrespective of whether they work these are rip off boards, that is they pretend to be real arduinos but they are not. This is known as passing off and the customs of your country is entitled to confiscate them with no compensation to you. Of course your chances of that happening are slim but there have been two people reporting here that is what happened to them.

Now the extra money you pay for a real one goes to things like running this forum, funding educational projects and developing the next generation of arduinos so there is a bit of a moral issue as well.

It could just be however that money is more important to you than this so take the risk, some people report they are good and others have had trouble. I doubt if you will get enough feedback to calculate the odds.

Out of interest what odds would be acceptable? It is well known that most people do not understand probability which is why insurance companies are rich, the same goes for casinos the difference is that when they loose they pay up.

grendle

another option is to build your own uno (i cant speak for the mega i havent done that) very cheaply. but even then, for another $10-15 or so you can just buy a real uno. i purchase an uno from amazon for 17 dollars that was real. shop around, but i agree with g.mike, i wouldnt intentionally buy a knock off. good luck  :D

robsbots

I have brought some "copy" Arduinos, but they where advertised as "Arduino Compatible" rather than trying to pass themselves off as originals.  I have had no problems with them, but that may be luck.

If you do think about building your own board, consider the fact that you will need to program the chip with a boot loader in some way unless you buy a ready programmed chip. This may require the purchase of a programmer of some sort if you don't already have access to one.  This can push the cost up. I would suggest paying the extra and get a real Arduino. If you have problems with it you have a reliable company to come back to.

I brought one board for a specific project. Now I have 2 Mega1280's and 3 Uno's plus a "Breadboard" Uno purchased as a kit.  You can always go for a cheaper "compatible" board for your second project once you have familiarized yourself with a know good original board.

I find them great to play with and test out ideas. I try to always keep a spare board available for play testing/research..... and the rest run various projects.

Just my thoughts.

Hope it helps.

Rob


Grumpy_Mike

Quote
If you do think about building your own board, consider the fact that you will need to program the chip with a boot loader in some way unless you buy a ready programmed chip.

Note that if you have an Arduino already this can be used as a programmer to blow boot loaders into your blank chips. That's what I do.

AlxDroidDev

I have several Arduino clones (UNO R3, Mega R3, Mega ADK R3, Nano V3.0, Pro Mini, Leonardo, plus a couple home-built ones), and except for the home-made ones, all of them are made in China.

I've never had absolutely any problems with any of them. A Mega R2 was my first, and it was abused quite a bit by me, until I gave it a friend of mine, who also makes it undergo quite a bit of stress quite often. That Arduino is still alive and kicking up to this day.

I would prefer a lot to have an original, but it is quite a hassle to get them in Brazil (anything that costs over US$ 50 gets taxed in 105%, and that also applies to any S&H paid) . The real deal Arduinos cost over US$ 150 here, plus you have the danger of people trying to pass clones as originals for about US$ 100.

Some of my projects:
Shield for DS1337+, DS1624 and AT24C1024B (RTC, temp & mem): http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php/topic,126197.0.html
CHDK Camera remote shutter (BT, IR, USB): http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=295377.0

retrolefty


I have several Arduino clones (UNO R3, Mega R3, Mega ADK R3, Nano V3.0, Pro Mini, Leonardo, plus a couple home-built ones), and except for the home-made ones, all of them are made in China.

I've never had absolutely any problems with any of them. A Mega R2 was my first, and it was abused quite a bit by me, until I gave it a friend of mine, who also makes it undergo quite a bit of stress quite often. That Arduino is still alive and kicking up to this day.

I would prefer a lot to have an original, but it is quite a hassle to get them in Brazil (anything that costs over US$ 50 gets taxed in 105%, and that also applies to any S&H paid) . The real deal Arduinos cost over US$ 150 here, plus you have the danger of people trying to pass clones as originals for about US$ 100.




That has been my experience also. I own a variety of original genuine made in Italy, 3rd party compatibles (Seeeduino mega), some Asian 'compatible' and home brewed boards (328P, 644P & 1284P based). All have operated without problems to date. I have no problems with the Asian E-bay arduino 'clones' as long as they properly honor the arduino trademark and clearly state they are compatibles rather then genuine made in Italy arduino boards. 

Lefty

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