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Topic: High-tech car theives (Read 5847 times) previous topic - next topic

wizdum

http://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2013/04/04/high-tech-thiefs-use-new-gadget-to-gain-keyless-access-to-vehicles-in-long-beach/

Any ideas? There is speculation that they are using a transmitter to overpower some of the communication lines inside the car, but I would think a car would have some pretty hefty shielding to deal with all that noise. I'm wondering if they may just be using a high powered magnet to overpower the relay/lock solenoid. I don't have a keyless entry system in my vehicle, so i'm not sure if unlocking the car would also disable the security system.

JChristensen

Perhaps they're emulating the key fob signals?

wizdum


Perhaps they're emulating the key fob signals?


All modern key fobs are supposed to use rolling, one time passwords, making this impossible. Thats according to the manufacturers. Its entirely possible that they decided it was cheaper just to use a unique ID and hope no one noticed.

Osgeld

that's been the scheme since day one, how long does it take a fast micro to brute force a limited number

I wonder more about the "unlock your door with an iPhone and start it up from cross country yay!" cars
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

Coding Badly

that's been the scheme since day one, how long does it take a fast micro to brute force a limited number


The technique includes disabling key-less entry when a brute force attack is detected.  (Which goes without saying that car manufacturers are not always the most reputable folks.)

Coding Badly


Are they beemers?

http://hackaday.com/2012/07/07/keyless-bmw-cars-prove-to-be-very-easy-to-steal/

wizdum

#6
Jun 07, 2013, 08:21 am Last Edit: Jun 07, 2013, 08:23 am by wizdum Reason: 1


Are they beemers?

http://hackaday.com/2012/07/07/keyless-bmw-cars-prove-to-be-very-easy-to-steal/



The video I saw showed the thieves being unable to break into a Ford and I think a Dodge? I believe they were able to get into a BMW. Another thing of note, none of the cars were stolen using this technique, items were just stolen from them. Even on vehicles with keyless ignition. So it seems they cannot trick the ignition system, only the door lock and security system. They also always used the passenger side door.

I wonder if it could be something as simple as some unscrupulous mechanics, garage employees, or valets using that BMW technique to make their own keyfobs, then coming back later.

Coding Badly

They also always used the passenger side door.


I suspect that's out of convenience rather than necessity.  Bit difficult to rummage around with a steering wheel in the way.

JChristensen

From http://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/computing/embedded-systems/cars-the-next-victims-of-cyberattacks:

Quote
Researchers at the University of California at San Diego and the University of Washington say that in their tinkering, they hit upon a cyberattack method by which thieves could cause large groups of cars to report their vehicle identification numbers (from which it is easy to determine the cars' years, makes, and models) and GPS coordinates. Having learned where the most prized vehicles are parked, the technique would allow criminals to issue another set of commands that remotely bypass the cars' security systems, unlock their doors, and start their engines. A similar technique, said the researchers, could be used to listen in on a driver's phone conversations, or worse, to disable one or multiple cars' brakes as they travel at highway speeds.


Also:
http://spectrum.ieee.org/riskfactor/green-tech/advanced-cars/hacking-cars-with-keyless-systems-feasible-and-practical-swiss-researchers-say
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=hack-my-ride


Riva

Maybe the TSA have insisted American cars have a master key override like they insist on for luggage locks and some bright spark has discovered this and got the master key?
Don't PM me for help as I will ignore it.

wizdum

I think we found it:
http://eprint.iacr.org/2010/332.pdf

They could use a wireless relay to trick the car into thinking the keyfob is closer. A second criminal would have to stand within 50 feet of the car owner/key, something that's not that hard for small city apartments or inside stores.

liuzengqiang

Damn those thieves!
Serial LCD keypad panel,phi_prompt user interface library,SDI-12 USB Adapter

liuzengqiang

Darn! Only worked on the trunk. I was still able to open doors and start the car. I need a metal box I guess.
Serial LCD keypad panel,phi_prompt user interface library,SDI-12 USB Adapter

wizdum


Darn! Only worked on the trunk. I was still able to open doors and start the car. I need a metal box I guess.


I was kind of hoping that would work. I guess the only option is to pull the battery or try to see if there is a setting you can turn off on the car.

liuzengqiang

I was hoping too. Just the thought that someone with a portable antenna walking around my building could steal my car is scary.
Serial LCD keypad panel,phi_prompt user interface library,SDI-12 USB Adapter

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