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Topic: Prototype PCB board soldering tips needed (Read 5286 times) previous topic - next topic

Yarash

Hi

I am pretty skilled in soldering, but i always

Get stuck in soldering ICs since most of the times the pins
Are not arranged in a comfortablee way (for example the 4051).

I end up soldering tiny wires from every pin to the destination,
I do not minde doing this, but then the isolation of the wires
Starts melting and i risk in creating a short.

Does anyone here have a good way for soldering ICs on a prototype
PCB board?

I must mention that the boards i have, have copper only
In the pin holes, no bridges.


Thanks.

runaway_pancake

Tin your tip!
Clean off the tip and then have some fresh melted solder on the tip of the iron, just before you touch it to your work, so that you don't have to heat the joint so long - touch the joint and hit it with a bit more solder.
"Who is like unto the beast? who is able to make war with him?"
When all else fails, check your wiring!

mmcp42

wipe the tip between every usage - I mean for each pin!
cleanliness is essential

you can use a damp sponge or a ball of copper strands or both
there are only 10 types of people
them that understands binary
and them that doesn't

dc42

#3
Jul 28, 2013, 11:40 pm Last Edit: Jul 29, 2013, 07:30 pm by dc42 Reason: 1
I generally use stripboard for analog circuits, and the Verowire system (http://www.verotl.com/en/category/Wiring%20Systems) for digital circuits. Glue the IC sockets to the board, make the power supply connections, add the decoupling capacitors, then place wiring combs between the rows of ICs. Wiring is then very quick using the wiring pen, you just wrap the wire around the IC socket pins and route it through the wiring combs. When a run is finished, you just solder the pins you have connected. The insulation melts and evaporates (so you need to do it in a well-ventilated area), and the joint is made.
Formal verification of safety-critical software, software development, and electronic design and prototyping. See http://www.eschertech.com. Please do not ask for unpaid help via PM, use the forum.

Yarash


I generally use stripboard for analog circuits, and the Verowire system (http://www.verotl.com/en/category/Wiring%20Systems) for digital circuits. Glue the IC sockets to the board, make the power supply connections, add the decoupling capacitors, then place wiring combs between the rows of ICs. Wiring is then very quick using the wiring pen, you just wrap the wore around the IC socket pins and route it through the wiring combs. When a run is finished, you just solder the pins you have connected. The insulation melts and evaporates (so you need to do it in a well-ventilated area), and the joint is made.


Sounds interesting,

Is there any chance for a video of this procedure?


Thanks!

MAS3

Get a soldering tip cleaner like this one.
It's cheap and works perfectly.
Just dip your tip in the metal scrap in there, and it's instant cleaned.
Does a better job than these spongy things that have to be kept wet (and cool down your iron more than this thing does).
I discovered the existence of these about a year ago, and i love it.

If you're going to solder on chips, don't solder each next pin, but leave a few pins after soldering one.
Of course you need to solder all the pins you need, just do not solder 1, 2, 3, 4... but for instance 1, 16, 8, 9, 5, 10 ... you get the drift.
That gives the wires or components you're soldering time to cool down and isolation to do some "curing".
Have a look at "blink without delay".
Did you connect the grounds ?
Je kunt hier ook in het Nederlands terecht: http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html

CrossRoads

Use wirewrap sockets - only tack the sockets in place, then twist wires onto the pins to make connections.
Nick Gammon did a nice wirewrap writeup here
http://www.gammon.com.au/forum/?id=11109
This box is all wirewrapped!
You can see a duemilanove hanging off where a promini eventually installed.

The other boards are individual LEDs, we soldered them down then wirewrapped right on the legs.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

MarkT

"blob board" or "tripad board" is good - the holes are connected in threes, not all separate, which is a nice
compromise between prototype board and stripboard.  Not sure if its sold under other names.

http://www.maplin.co.uk/tripad-board-1922
[ I will NOT respond to personal messages, I WILL delete them, use the forum please ]

dc42



I generally use stripboard for analog circuits, and the Verowire system (http://www.verotl.com/en/category/Wiring%20Systems) for digital circuits. Glue the IC sockets to the board, make the power supply connections, add the decoupling capacitors, then place wiring combs between the rows of ICs. Wiring is then very quick using the wiring pen, you just wrap the wore around the IC socket pins and route it through the wiring combs. When a run is finished, you just solder the pins you have connected. The insulation melts and evaporates (so you need to do it in a well-ventilated area), and the joint is made.


Sounds interesting,

Is there any chance for a video of this procedure?


Maybe I'll video it next time I wire a board. There is a short write up and photo at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiring_pencil, although the wiring combs in that photo are not the Vero ones that I use.

Wire wrap is an alternative, but with significant disadvantages:

- you have to use expensive wire-wrap sockets
- you have to strip the wires to the required length, or else pick from a selection of expensive pre-stripped wires
- if N component pins are to be connected together, you have to wire N-1 runs (with a wiring pen, you connect them all in a single run)
- you end up with a very deep board that is difficult to fit in an enclosure
Formal verification of safety-critical software, software development, and electronic design and prototyping. See http://www.eschertech.com. Please do not ask for unpaid help via PM, use the forum.

Yarash

The attached link actually looks terrible :)

And for a prototype is incredibly hard to troubleshoot.


I did get some ideas from this thread.

Thanks everyone for the suggestions!

CrossRoads

Wirewrap "disadvantage" counterpoint:
Inexpensive sockets can be found. I regularly purchase lots of 30-and 40-pin long strips and breakoff only the amount needed. Since sockets are used, components can easily  be removed & changed without potentially disastrous unsoldering.
Stripping wire is not difficult - and each and every joint does not need soldering afterwards. Since there is no soldering, changes and/or corrections are easy to make.
N components need a wire if all are daisychained - but its also very easy to make a change on a board if needed.
Board does not have to be deep - different level wirewrap pins are available if fewer connections are being made.
No wiring combs are needed.

In the end: Either method can be used for prototypes.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

dc42


The attached link actually looks terrible :)


Why do you say that?


And for a prototype is incredibly hard to troubleshoot.


Why do you think so? It's very easy to check the connections with a multimeter. About 35 years ago, I built a computer using the Verowire system (that was before the days of northbridge/southbridge chips that did nearly everything for you), and had no problems troubleshooting it. [The only problem I had was due to the Z80 at the heart of it not meeting its specifications, which they amended in a subsequent revision of the datasheet.]
Formal verification of safety-critical software, software development, and electronic design and prototyping. See http://www.eschertech.com. Please do not ask for unpaid help via PM, use the forum.

dc42


Wirewrap "disadvantage" counterpoint:
Inexpensive sockets can be found. I regularly purchase lots of 30-and 40-pin long strips and breakoff only the amount needed.


OK, I learned something.


Since sockets are used, components can easily  be removed & changed without potentially disastrous unsoldering.


I always use sockets with Verowire too; but I don't need wire-wrap sockets, almost any sort of DIP socket will do.


Stripping wire is not difficult


No, but measuring the required length, cutting and stripping it does take time.


- and each and every joint does not need soldering afterwards.


Soldering the joints takes very little time. I suspect that wrapping the Verowire wire around the IC socket with the wiring pen and soldering it takes no more time than wire wrapping 1 wire, and certainly less than wire-wrapping 2 wires.


Since there is no soldering, changes and/or corrections are easy to make.


The number of corrections should be much lower than the number of wires initial wired. But corrections are easy to make with Verowire. Use a solder sucker to remove most of the solder from the socket pin, cut out any wires you don't want, add new wires, and resolder.


N components need a wire if all are daisychained - but its also very easy to make a change on a board if needed.


If I wire A-B and B-C using wire wrap, that's no different to wiring A-B-C with Verowire. If I decide I don't want A-B or B-C, then I can just snip it out. If I don't want A-C, then it's no different whether I use wire wrap or Verowire, I have to remove or snip out both A-B and B-C.


Board does not have to be deep - different level wirewrap pins are available if fewer connections are being made.


Where does that leave you when you need to make corrections?


No wiring combs are needed.


OK, I'm spending £0.02 (about 3c) on wiring combs, but by using non-wire-wrap IC sockets, I've probably saved more than that already.


In the end: Either method can be used for prototypes.


Quite so.
Formal verification of safety-critical software, software development, and electronic design and prototyping. See http://www.eschertech.com. Please do not ask for unpaid help via PM, use the forum.

ph77


Nick Gammon did a nice wirewrap writeup here
http://www.gammon.com.au/forum/?id=11109

Sorry for offtopic question, but I just noticed a 10k resistor between RX and TXD in the schematic above. Why is it there? Is it an error? I have always connected it directly... Link to the schematic:
http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Wire_Wrapped_Atmega132_e.png

Yarash

Well, this is an idea i got,
I think at least for main GND and + strips it could be fun :)

I will atempt to use it with a magnet wire, the height is just
An example, will probably be lower

Also these specific pins reject the soldering, waiting
For copper pins.

Inspired by the High-Voltage lines running in the street :D

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