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Topic: Enhanced Serial Monitor - Version 3.1.3 UPDATE (Read 84264 times) previous topic - next topic

acboother

Sounds like this may be the ticket to retrieve the data from a Flywheel Dyno. Would love a copy.
Probably will do what you want. You have mail.

Is this dyno full size or for models? Tell us a bit more please.

Alan

Steve_

Would love a copy to use for viewing the output of an oxygen, a temperature and a humidity sensor.

Steve

acboother

Steve_ you have PM. Hope it does what you want.

Alan


cesr2330

Good morning, I am from Colombia, and I am in a project that consists of graphing signals from pressure, flow, temperature sensors, among others.

It is necessary to have a sampling frequency of at least 20 milliseconds, so far I have only been able to make measurements to more than 60 milliseconds, but it is necessary to decrease that value. When I try to lower the frequency, the program closes.

I don't know how to solve that problem in my project, and I would love to be able to guide you with your proposal.

Thank you very much for your attention.
When under 30 milliseconds, the SerialPortDataRecived generates error. "Modified collection enumeration operation cannot be executed."

Sorry for my English, I'm still learning.


acboother

Hi, I'm not really sure what you have going on there. Perhaps you are sending too much data for the performance of your PC. What PC are you using for this?

Have you tried comms at higher baud rates?

May be you should migrate to version 4 but you will have to make a few changes to your messages but its not too difficult to do. https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=500805.0

This is faster and the message packs are also smaller which helps.

There will be a time a limit to how much data you can send to the ESM. Perhaps you have reached that limit? If so you will have to send less, collect data up and send in a separate faze or only use a text visualiser like the LOG.

Alan

GoForSmoke

I tripped across this thread looking for something else so haven't read through the 14 pages.

Does your serial monitor have any kind of cursor controls?

I coded for ANSI terminals for over 10 years, both VTxxx and Wysexxx and later on terminal programs on x86 PC's.

Once you have cursor controls you can end the scrolling, print labels like you would for a report and display values for them and the values can be changed right in their places exactly like you would do with LCD or TFT displays.

I wrote a lot of business software that used edit and report screens that way and do have an example sketch for Arduino writing to a software terminal window that does have to be set up which is more than beginners would like to do. In a box in the bottom of the display it shows a ball (char 'O') bouncing inside of a box... I had to use time code to slow that down enough to see, Arduino absolutely wipes up doing text work!
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

acboother

Sorry no terminal emulation available. I wrote VT100 emulator years ago for PCs and I don't think I'll be going back down that path again. Cursor control... may be I'll have a think on that one.


Version 3 of the ESM has been replaced with V4. https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=500805.0

A new update of 4 is due soon with some clean ups.

GoForSmoke

Cursor control including clear screen/form feed is all it would take to bring serial monitor up to next level uses.

The other critical function is key entry rather than line entry. Keys need to be seen as they are pressed or released to allow responsive user IO.

We already have software terminals. Windoze has Hyperterminal and PuTTY and Linux has several choices. The PITA part especially for beginners is the setup.

Attached is a >9000 byte post sample, it's not -the- best demo but it does demonstrate key entry and cursor control on a PC terminal. The box and ball are from a demo I wrote for microTutor at the UofD back in 81 or 82.
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

acboother

You will see I took out some simple 'keyboard' entry options out when I went from v3 to v4.

Simulating a keyboard to send 'keystrokes' to the Arduino? Is that what you are suggesting?

And then a set of messages that work with the "LCD" type screen that can be sent from the Arduino to the ESM?


GoForSmoke

#205
Aug 19, 2019, 05:24 pm Last Edit: Aug 19, 2019, 05:33 pm by GoForSmoke
You will see I took out some simple 'keyboard' entry options out when I went from v3 to v4.

Simulating a keyboard to send 'keystrokes' to the Arduino? Is that what you are suggesting?

And then a set of messages that work with the "LCD" type screen that can be sent from the Arduino to the ESM?


Simulating a keyboard? I don't think so.. I mean when a real PC keyboard key is pressed it should send the key to the Arduino immediately without echo, what VT100 does. That is as opposed to the IDE SM that uses line entry. Like edlin vs vi editing.

Your PC keyboard can be used as a button box, every char on-screen can be used like a led without wiring anything. That is what the sketch I attached shows, you hit the right keys to change the motion of the "ball" in the box and it responds immediately. It allows a whole lot to be shown w/o wiring anything.

In the early-mid 80's my fave cursor controls were done by printing char values smaller than 0x20. They take fewer bytes than Esc chars. IIRC my Wyse to Z80 ran at 19200 baud, the fewer chars sent the faster the screen would hop.

Yeah, that demo uses Esc chars... I know. I could find the Esc chars docs but not using non-printables for one space left, right, up, or down. Bell was char 7 and clear screen was FF, char 12.
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

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