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Topic: How long can my arduino work continuosly? (Read 16612 times) previous topic - next topic

FTBug

One thing that has not been mentioned for "always on" systems is that it's a good idea to use the watchdog to reset your system in case of software crash (yes it happens if your system is complex enough to allow Murphy's law to apply...).

:smiley-mr-green:

westfw

Yes, it is somewhat a paradox of embedded systems that it can be (MUCH) better to crash and restart than to go on operating incorrectly.  Arguably, long-duration applications should consider resetting themselves "often" rather than worrying about the possible bugs that might crop up when millis() overflows.  After all, a complete reset only takes a couple of seconds.

OTOH, this could encourage "sloppy" programming.

68tjs

Don't  worries about the microcontroller in an arduino board  weakest components are  capacitors.

retrolefty


Don't  worries about the microcontroller in an arduino board  weakest components are  capacitors.


Having followed along with posters problems for around five years now, I would say the weakest component is the AVR chip's output pins due to lack of electronics knowlege and experiance. Subjecting arduino pins to voltages below zero or above 5.5vdc is probably a close second. So the weakest component by far is really the user.  ;)

68tjs


I would say the weakest component is the AVR chip's output pins due to lack of electronics knowlege and experiance.

If you do not follow the manufacturer's instructions everything is possible.

Curents in output (sink or source) are strickly specified by Atmel.
Current limits indicated by Arduino are false -> they correspond to "Absolute Maximum Rating".

When looking reliability rule for capacitor is not to exceed half the maximum voltage specified by the manufacturer.

I have an UNO R2 with capacitors 25 volts, which is suitable for use between 8V and 12V.
Now Arduino  for all his boards uses 16 Volt capacitors which, in my opinion, makes the boards no reliable over several years.

We can give no indications without having accelerated aging tests.
Without this tests the only message that can be delivered is  "we think it can work ..... but we can not exclude that it can fail.

retrolefty

Quote

I have an UNO R2 with capacitors 25 volts, which is suitable for use between 8V and 12V.
Now Arduino  for all his boards uses 16 Volt capacitors which, in my opinion, makes the boards no reliable over several years.


We have a user around here (James C4S ?) that I believe says he works/worked for a cap company. Maybe he can weight in if he thinks running a 16 volt cap at 12 volts is significant for long term reliability or not.

68tjs

I am retired, but before I worked in R&D for Alcatel  , now Alcatel-Lucent and it was the rule that we have to respect for professional Telecom Devices.

retrolefty


I am retired, but before I worked in R&D for Alcatel  , now Alcatel-Lucent and it was the rule that we have to respect for professional Telecom Devices.


Many companies and industries have internal rules/guidelines/recommendations for how much allowance/tolerance/over-specifications to incorporate into a design, however some times these rules can become dated or not applicable with changing technology and other advancements in components and materials.

The DC-3 air plane designed in the 1930s, some still flying today and is famous for the over designed strength of it's wing design, it had huge margins. No aircraft company today could afford to over design to such a degree and still be competitive.


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