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Topic: Powering Multiple Arduinos with the Same Power Source? (Read 3758 times) previous topic - next topic

MAXOFLIFE

Apr 09, 2014, 06:43 am Last Edit: Apr 09, 2014, 06:55 am by MAXOFLIFE Reason: 1
I am working on a project right now that is going to involve two Arduinos, maybe even three, when I finally complete it. Here's a diagram I just made to quickly demonstrate what I had pictured in my head:



Again, very rough diagram. Is this a viable way to power the two Arduinos? What if I added a third one (Arduino Micro) in the exact same fashion as the other two?

Edit: Whoops, just realized the Arduino Micro doesn't have a DC jack and that I would have to power it with the VIN pin. Well, that complicates things. How would I convert either the 5v or the 3.7v to 7v to work correctly with the Aduino Micro?

Thank you for your time!  XD

fungus


Again, very rough diagram. Is this a viable way to power the two Arduinos?


Yes.



What if I added a third one (Arduino Micro) in the exact same fashion as the other two?


No problem.


Edit: Whoops, just realized the Arduino Micro doesn't have a DC jack and that I would have to power it with the VIN pin. Well, that complicates things.


No, it makes it easier. If you have a 5V supply then you connect it directly to the 5V/Vcc pin.

nb. This applies to the Uno as well. If you have a 5V supply you do not connect it to the barrel jack. Connect to the 5V pin


Thank you for your time!  XD


Thanks for remembering that our time isn't free.
Advanced Arduino

MAXOFLIFE

The only problem I have though is that I have had multiple different sources say that either 5v to the VIN will work and the 5v to the VIN won't work.

On the official page for the Arduino Micro, it says under Power;

"The board can operate on an external supply of 6 to 20 volts. If supplied with less than 7V, however, the 5V pin may supply less than five volts and the board may be unstable. If using more than 12V, the voltage regulator may overheat and damage the board. The recommended range is 7 to 12 volts."

I'm just curious as to why some people say 5v while the website says 7v. I just don't want to screw up my board  :~

fungus


The only problem I have though is that I have had multiple different sources say that either 5v to the VIN will work and the 5v to the VIN won't work.


I didn't say "5v to VIN" (which won't work), I said "5V to 5V"...

If you definitely have a 5V step-up then connect it directly to the 5V pin. Not the DC jack, not the Vin pin.

(measure the voltage first if you're not sure)


I'm just curious as to why some people say 5v while the website says 7v. I just don't want to screw up my board


7V is for VIN or DC jack (which are the same thing).

ie. 5V to the DC jack of an Arduino Undo won't work.

Advanced Arduino

jn-wp

Perhaps at one point your power source will not give you enough "current". so you should be aware of it and check how many amperes there are running?!?

Peter_I


.......
I'm just curious as to why some people say 5v while the website says 7v. I just don't want to screw up my board  :~


The "normal way", powering the board through the barrel jack, feeds the power to a voltage regulator. It will take anything from 7 to 20 V, and regulate it to a nice and civilized 5V.

But it has to have some overvoltage to regulate down from, to make those 5V.

..... Or you can feed 5 V directly to the board, bypassing the regulator.
"Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool"

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