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Topic: Is Arduino Yun still in Beta? After many wasted hours I found this...... (Read 12950 times) previous topic - next topic

michaelbgwilliam

It's April 2015 and issues with the Yún still don't seem to be resolved.

I can program it to do some things but when the program begins to get complex it all collapses.

Once I reset, reboot and reconfigure it will accepts some simple routines until it collapses again.

I'm going back to my Raspberry Pi 2.


jessemonroy650

It's April 2015 and issues with the Yún still don't seem to be resolved.

I can program it to do some things but when the program begins to get complex it all collapses.

Once I reset, reboot and reconfigure it will accepts some simple routines until it collapses again.

I'm going back to my Raspberry Pi 2.


@michaelbgwilliam,
it appears yourself and others have a misunderstanding of the architecture. The Arduino Yún is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega32u4 and the Atheros AR9331. So, it is two chips - two separate chips that communicate over a serial port. The Atmel ATmega32u4 has:

- 16/32K Bytes of In-System Self-Programmable Flash (ATmega16U4/ATmega32U4)
- 1.25/2.5K Bytes Internal SRAM (ATmega16U4/ATmega32U4)
- 512Bytes/1K Bytes Internal EEPROM (ATmega16U4/ATmega32U4)

So putting a banana in a tailpipe seems like a great movie gag, but it hardly ever works. Piping a large amount of data to the Atmel seems silly too, since the purpose of the IO pins on the Atmel is to gather data not push it out. In addition, the pipe is about 200kbps - not very fast. In addition, there is NO buffer on the Atmel side. So jamming it with data only it up while it tries to keep up, is also silly because the best you might get is lock down for a long period of time.

In summation, I don't know the extent of your project, so whether the Arduino Yun is useful is hard to say. But to conclude the Raspberry Pi might be the system for you. I own two, and I use them when the Yun cannot do the job.

Best of Luck,
Jesse

jafrei

I think it doesn't make sense to compare the Yun to a rPi. They are different tools for different jobs. One is a microcontroller with some nice microcomputer functionality, the other is only a nice microcomputer.

I have three Yuns, two of them serving as webservers of a multi-threaded database application that serves different websites for all the appliances I want to control, including logging of the status of the appliances, user actions, and a few environmental parameters where the controlled appliance is a heating or cooling device. This includes background jobs, that make sure that the user input is properly communicated to and acknowledged by the appliances.

All this on the Atheros side, functioning under real world conditions for half a year now (one of the two webservers has currently connectivity issues though, see the thread for details). The Yun without the connectivity issues is up for several weeks now, without reset.

Some appliances are controlled via http directly on the Atheros side.

Some other appliances are controlled by a half a dozen remote Arduinos that communicate with the MCU on the Yun via a nRF24 network. I use the bridge, but not the client/server model, rather .get() and .put(). I found that more transparent and practical.

And yes, I also develop in parallel on a rPi, as "Plan B", and just for the fun of it, just in case the whole database application / webserver architecture on the Yun's Atheros hits it's limits. I would then use the rPi as the webserver and control an Arduino UNO with the rPi to access my nRF24 network. But, knock on wood, the Yuns do it all so far.

I'm sure what I have is not the most complex and sophisticated application for Yuns, but I think I came quite far - 9 months ago I didn't even know what a microcontroller is and I had absolutely no contact with a unix system before (I work in IT though for almost 30 years).

So yes, the Yun is very suitable for beginners. Even if one has absolutely no clue about microcontroller and microcomputer, unix in general, openWRT in particular, forgot everything they learned in school about resistors, LEDs, etc., but is eager to learn, and determined to get things to work.

Bottom line: I would not agree that the Yun is beta. It's IT though. Software eventually works, hardware eventually fails. What keeps it interesting, and everyone of us learning, every day.

jafrei


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