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Topic: can digital pin output voltage? Arduino Pro Mini 5v (Read 2174 times) previous topic - next topic

TobiasRipper

May 07, 2014, 11:48 pm Last Edit: May 08, 2014, 12:01 am by TobiasRipper Reason: 1
I have a device which performs a series of actions when 5v are fed to its input only at 10 A/h  per hour. I want Arduino to send these five volts however all my analog pins have been already used up for reading potentiometets. now I know that digitall pins are functional only in binary, which means they are either on or off. I am wonderingis If it id possible to send out 5 volts or zero volts from the digitalpins of an Arduino Pro Mini 5v?

now I would like to pointthat I am NOTusing the Arduino to power up the device.  The device already has its own power source: and is using a second pair of pins to read whether or not 5 volts is coming into them. If the device detects 5 volts in those two pins, it performs an action. the device will not however recognize input if it's anywhere below 5v. It will simply not perform that action.

PS I apologize for my lack of understanding Arduino components and basic computing functionality and not using standard electronic  terminology to ask my question. I am trying to make a small project from scraps of little understanding of this topic that I have.
Habeeb!!! Clean up on aisle four!!!

Paul__B

Sending out either 5V or 0V is precisely what digital ports are designed to do.

You may only draw up to 20 mA from each - that is milliamps or thousandths of an Amp, and a total of about 200 mA for the whole device at any one time.

You seem to be generally confused about how electricity functions.

TobiasRipper

Yes I am. I just didn't know how many volts would make a 1 in binary with Arduino. now if it sends a 1 does the 5v come out as a pulse or continuous? Because the device will continue its action only for as long as detects a 5v input. so if the Arduinos digital pin does not send 5v continuously then the device wont work.
Habeeb!!! Clean up on aisle four!!!

Paul__B

The output of an Arduino pin - when set by the program to be an output - is in the form of a "latch"; when the program tells it to be a logical "1" or HIGH, then it switches to 5V and stays there until another program instruction tells it to be a logical "0" or LOW, at which point it switches to 0V (and can "sink" the rated amount of current from something to which you connect it) and stays that way and so on.

Do read all through the tutorials and information available on the Arduino site as I cited before.

TobiasRipper

Got it. Thank you kindly for your help and I will.
Habeeb!!! Clean up on aisle four!!!

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