Go Down

Topic: Banguino - Arduino made as a chip (Read 4556 times) previous topic - next topic

kiiid

Jun 12, 2014, 07:13 am Last Edit: Jun 14, 2014, 12:54 am by kiiid Reason: 1
I have made a new Arduino-compatible module. It is an expanded version of the Uno and compatible with it, plus some extra features to offer.
Banguino is specifically designed for wearable electronics, robots, xcopters and other embedded stuff. It is for a bit more advanced users - those who design their own boards, but still want to use the existing code base.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rk0Fy_IUBxA
http://dimitech.com/products.php

liuzengqiang

Wow wow wow, this is some seriously cool stuff! What inspired you into making chip like boards? I'm intrigued. You can easily hand solder the socket to a custom board. Then bang! All the arduino goodies and sd card + more?! This could be the solution to a lot of small projects gone commercial. They worry about their board and you just make these chips for others to mount. Raspberry pi is making a module that will slide into an SODIMM slot but that slot is still hard to hand solder. Yours seems great for some of my projects too. Unfortunately the one I am heavily working on needs to squeeze every dime I spend.

The arduino team should really have a look at this! All they are making right now are complete boards. They can break through if they make something like this :D

Great price too!
Serial LCD keypad panel,phi_prompt user interface library,SDI-12 USB Adapter

kiiid

#2
Jun 19, 2014, 12:56 am Last Edit: Jun 19, 2014, 12:58 am by kiiid Reason: 1
Thank you for the good words  :)
Making embedded boards in standard chip formats is a natural evolutionary process: discrete components -> IC -> embedded modules -> embedded modules as IC
There are many boards currently available in DIP40, DIP64, etc, but they all result in relatively thick final devices simply because they have pins. I have tried to find an acceptable compromise between size and easiness to work with both on factory level or by hand, and that led to the selection of the PLCC68 format. Banguino can be used as a SMT component as well (you can download the Altium library from my website and soon I will try to provide one for Eagle as well). Using it as SMT allows the making of very thin boards - 3-4mm overall thickness, and still built around the great existing Arduino programming platform. That is very important for wearable electronics or robotic stuff. What I am offering is just another option for the users so their designs don't get constrained by size in any dimension.
I hope some people may find it useful when making their projects... :)

liuzengqiang

Well, I see lots of custom "Arduino compatible" boards with 328 chips and some with 644, 32U4, but rarely 2560 or other more advanced and larger chips. If Arduino team makes them into PLCC chip format with some peripherals, this would enable the arduino ecosystem to evolve into more complex designs buy more novice PCB designers. Just 2 layer and just free EAGLE license and you are good to go. Exciting. Hope they stop chasing the new board pushers and stop to think how to get all their more recent boards into small production projects for us. For projects that need more memory and pins, I am still using the Arduino MEGA2560 boards. I got 2 clones and the rest are all from Arduino. That is about 100 of them.
Serial LCD keypad panel,phi_prompt user interface library,SDI-12 USB Adapter

kiiid

Everything in its time. This is only my first attempt to join the Arduino community. If people accept the idea, with time I will design more advanced compatible processing modules. I have a few ideas waiting. They all will be pin-compatible and interchangeable so systems designed with older models can be upgraded without any problems.


liuzengqiang

Just curious, how did you make a PCB that has metal contacts around itself to sit in a PLCC socket?
Serial LCD keypad panel,phi_prompt user interface library,SDI-12 USB Adapter

kiiid

#6
Jul 06, 2014, 09:21 am Last Edit: Jul 06, 2014, 09:26 am by kiiid Reason: 1
This is a not very well known PCB fabrication option called 'side plating'. Usually PCB factories can do it, but many designers don't know about that.
The rest is just a  properly designed board to strictly follow the PLCC specs.


Chagrin

Can you provide a hi-res picture of one of the chips (or board, or board chips, whatever)?

kiiid

These are the pictures I have at the moment. I will try to take more hi-res pics with a better camera and update them soon.

Go Up