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Topic: What areas of electronics are useful to learn about for arduino projects? (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

tomchambers

I am familiar with basic components and concepts. I'm also fairly proficient with various programming languages. I'm wondering what kind of electrical engineering concepts I should learn about to help me build circuits for doing basic stuff with sensors and actuators - PIR detector, temperature, light sensor, speaker, activating a relay etc.

I know there's an enormous amount of complexity that one can go into with circuit design, but it seems that a lot of that logic can be done on the microcontroller provided that speed isn't an issue. However, from looking at people's projects there is often more than just wiring a component straight up - putting resistors, capacitors etc inbetween.

luisilva

Don't be afraid. If you have that background, you should not  have problems with Arduino. This platform was thought for people that don't have any background of electronic or programming. Start with something more easy, study and the things will come naturally. And you always have the forum to ask questions. So, you are not alone!

Welcome!

Peter_n

In the top menu, click "Learning" and "Playground", that is enough to give you many ideas.
When you have interest in certain things, just ask. We problably know fun projects.

cjdelphi

I once had a teacher/supervisor who grumbled on about how students now just use an mc to do the work over the use of good old logicchips...

I guess it boils down to what you want to do, no point learning about low pass filters if all you want to do us blink an led and make it go beep

mart256


I am familiar with basic components and concepts. I'm also fairly proficient with various programming languages. I'm wondering what kind of electrical engineering concepts I should learn about to help me build circuits for doing basic stuff with sensors and actuators - PIR detector, temperature, light sensor, speaker, activating a relay etc.

I know there's an enormous amount of complexity that one can go into with circuit design, but it seems that a lot of that logic can be done on the microcontroller provided that speed isn't an issue. However, from looking at people's projects there is often more than just wiring a component straight up - putting resistors, capacitors etc inbetween.


Im studying electrical engineering. Ill write down some subjects Ive learned along the years that may be helpful to you.

PID controller, linear circuits and opams, semiconductor devices (transistors, diodes, thyristors, igbt) and power control, digital systems (flip flop, demux, mux, logic gates and nand xor), industrial control (plc), communication protocols (modbus, profibus, ethernet ip, canbus, fieldbus in general).

Peter_n

No sensors ? Life is so boring without sensors.
What about wireless communication ?

There is PID library for Arduino, that could be fun : http://playground.arduino.cc/Code/PIDLibrary
Nick Gammon wrote many useful pages: http://www.gammon.com.au/forum/bbshowpost.php?bbtopic_id=123
I also like the Adafruit blog : http://www.adafruit.com/blog/

Is there something that is actually needed ? Like a special adapted device for a disabled person. The Arduino Leonardo can emulate an usb mouse and keyboard, which makes it perfect for such things.

CrossRoads

Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

dave-in-nj

Quote

looking at people's projects there is often more than just wiring a component straight up - putting resistors, capacitors etc inbetween.


the place to start is ohm's law.

it reveals what the 'etc' means in your sentence.

learn about resistors, capacitors, inductors, transistors and you will establish a foundation that will hold your highest buildings.

skip these and you are building on quicksand.

if you are not sure, ask !  the guys on here who know this stuff blind folded will explain it to you.




ad2049q

How about;

buy a "12V" "10Watt" rated solar panel, enough batteries to make up 12V rechargeable, a 20 pack of "bog standard nfet" and an assortment of axial resistors, some pinboard, some bits of wire, and set up your arduino to be its own self-contained solar powered arduino with enough switching and logic to keep the batteries topped up but never severely overcharged.

As a project it can be extended in lots of ways, and you'd have a self-contained solar powered arduino with plenty of spare i/o pins for any other projects which you do.

As for learning, read every datasheet which you can find.  Much of them is useless max and min ranges outside of normal conditions, but they sometimes include known-good example circuits which have been tested thoroughly.

And you'll want a multimeter.
If you can scounge a 2 to 10 year old pc and install linux, the function "arecord" and free application "xoscope" can be useful.

Peter_n

Good idea 8)
But in that case, don't use a 10 year old computer  =( It requires a lot of current while the performance is less than a tablet. That's not eco-friendly.

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