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Topic: How to replace solenoid power source with capacitor (Read 4334 times) previous topic - next topic

Primat3

#15
Sep 09, 2014, 06:18 am Last Edit: Sep 09, 2014, 06:56 am by Primat3 Reason: 1
Thanks Runaway Pancake. That did it. I am naming that blue wire The Pancake in your honor.

Primat3

You still get Karma for putting yourself through all the (unnecessary) hassle. Relax, life's too short.

raschemmel

#17
Sep 09, 2014, 06:53 am Last Edit: Sep 09, 2014, 06:58 am by raschemmel Reason: 1
I must admit I was getting frustrated.
The schematic Runaway Pancake posted is essentially the same as the one I linked in Reply#1 (see attached)

Quote
The schematic is correct for wiring to the 12V out of a 300 Watt Power Supply Unit (PSU)


If by this you are referring to a computer Power Supply box then where does the 12V AA battery pack come in ? Was that just a test power supply ?

This :
Quote
Now, I understand you that to replace the PSU for the battery pack, I need to run the battery's negative to ground. How? the arduino's? shoving it up my ass? the schematic is NOT for the battery pack, that's were I am trying to get to. The schematic IS for the PSU and it DOES work.  

and this:

Quote
The circuit works fine from the PSU, the solenoid works fine straight from the battery pack, but when I switch the PSU for the battery pack I don't get the solenoid to pull. What gives?


seem to be contradictory, but regardless, what you ended up using is the same thing I posted in Reply#1.


So to make a long story short,  you didn't realize that the power supply powering the solenoid needs to have a common ground with the uC driving the solenoid, right ?

I'm sorry you were upset but I did everything I could to tell you there was something wrong with the wiring.

Primat3

#18
Sep 09, 2014, 07:09 am Last Edit: Sep 09, 2014, 07:12 am by Primat3 Reason: 1
Quote
If by this you are referring to a computer Power Supply box then where does the 12V AA battery pack come in ? Was that just a test power supply ?

Yes, the PSU is a computer power supply now mooning as bench power supply. The PSU was the test power supply, the batteries were the objective.

Quote
So to make a long story short,  you didn't realize that the power supply powering the solenoid needs to have a common ground with the uC driving the solenoid, right ?

Correct. Though that is not the case when using the PSU, and the fact that the battery pack straight to the solenoid didn't work when I first tried it (no idea what I did wrong with just two cables and a few batteries), plus some incorrect info out there on the forums, made me think AA batteries just could not discharge fast enough to provide 0.6 amps.

Quote
I'm sorry you were upset but I did everything I could to tell you there was something wrong with the wiring.

No hard feelings. You did help me out, and your initial response was correct. We were just talking through each other. Again, thanks for the help.

raschemmel

Your welcome , and I apologize for losing my patience. I'm usually pretty good about that but I spun out this time.
The importance of a common ground cannot be underestimated.

runaway_pancake


@RunawayPancake,
Thanks for correcting the OP's schematic , but if you look at his schematic and look at yours it is clear that the problem was more than a missing ground.


I didn't make any alterations to that drawing.  My only intervention was The Big Blue Wire of Victory.


Can you please explain to the OP why his circuit would not work the way he had it shown in his schematic ?


Without The Big Blue Wire of Victory there would be no base current.  Can't do much with a transistor without base current ( IB )
"Who is like unto the beast? who is able to make war with him?"
When all else fails, check your wiring!

raschemmel

@Runaway Pancake,

That's ok. I just noticed the OP corrected his schematic in Reply#6 , but three hours later, (somewhere in between Reply#9 and Reply#10  he went back to Reply#6 and corrected it). I don't know how the circuit was wired but the schematic In Reply#13 has more
problems than a missing ground wire but the OP corrected it. I thought you had corrected until I noticed the last edit on Reply#6 was 3 hours after the time stamp for that post. That's when I realized it wasn't you who corrected it.

The schematic I posted in Reply#13 is what it looked like before he corrected it. And the schematic you posted with the blue line
is electrically the same as the one I posted in Reply#1.

All's well that ends well.  The only important thing is that the OP got his circuit working. The rest is just noise.

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