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Topic: Smaller substitute for Arduino uno (Read 8116 times) previous topic - next topic

tonyT40

I am a newbie to the Arduino family.  I would like to know which board I can use that is smaller and cheaper than the Uno once I develop a project that I would like to make permanent.  Preferably the new board should have all the supporting hardware found on the Uno board.  Thanks for any help on this.

robtillaart

1) design your own
2) check Teensy
Rob Tillaart

Nederlandse sectie - http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html -
(Please do not PM for private consultancy)

fungus


I am a newbie to the Arduino family.  I would like to know which board I can use that is smaller and cheaper than the Uno once I develop a project that I would like to make permanent.  Preferably the new board should have all the supporting hardware found on the Uno board.  Thanks for any help on this.


It's called the "Pro Mini".

Advanced Arduino

fungus


1) design your own
2) check Teensy


???

1) Why? Pro Minis are $2.50 each.
2) Not Uno compatible.
Advanced Arduino

robtillaart

1) to get it as small as possible,
2) How is teensy not UNO compatible? do you use shields?
Rob Tillaart

Nederlandse sectie - http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html -
(Please do not PM for private consultancy)

Docedison

#5
Sep 20, 2014, 07:28 pm Last Edit: Sep 20, 2014, 07:32 pm by Docedison Reason: 1
My Teensy3.1's have no issues running any t85, Uno or any other Arduino code unless the code requires pins that aren't present on the teensy.
Most changes required either involve the 3.3 analog ports. (the digital ports are 5v tolerant) or adding port buffers to increase the drive current...
There are some other differences but those are more likely to deal with things like DMA functions or the two really neat and fast I2C ports that can operate @ 2+ MHz
Some time basic I wrote (borrowed) a tiny 85 sketch that makes a yellow led... flicker like a candle in a small breeze.
I changed the led pin to a PWM port and I have a  pretty little candle... with an ldr for daylight shutdowm sensing..
Having 256 k of flash, 64k of sram and 2k of Eeprom, full USB a 12 bit dac as well as using the large Arduino code base both .023 and 1.0+ versions is nice too.
That the board can be overclocked to 96 +  MHz from a 72 MHz default is nice also. The board will work to from 4, 8, 14, 24, 48 and 72 MHz where 96 MHz is a menu selectable over clock option... the board can go to 186 MHz with some small code changes, Too.
So the Teensy 3.1 @ $19.80 from PJRC or $17.00 from OSH Part is a nice fast and inexpensive board that is easy or better to use than  A 16 MHz Pro mini.
I don't recommend starting out with a teensy unless your basic  code skills are good however it's a good bridge between a Mega 2560 and  a Due.. and at the price, adding the cost of an Arduino compatible Uno style shield board... places It just below the cost of a Mega R3. and some of  the add-on boards support the use of the nRF24XX. Two 8 pin connectors, one for HW support and the other for bitbanged SPI... available from Tindie
It's a combination That's hard to beat...
One more thing is that there is a good forum for support of your your issues...   Too.

Doc
--> WA7EMS <--
"The solution of every problem is another problem." -Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
I do answer technical questions PM'd to me with whatever is in my clipboard

ian332isport

I always find the Nano is a great/smaller alternative to the Uno.

Ian.

mcnobby

I am a big fan of the Attiny13, there are cores on here for it.
Its only got 1k flash and 64 bytes of ram
£0.35 each in small qty's

Its a LOT of fun trying to pack as much in to 1k/64b as possible, you really start to look at simplification disciplines

I have just finished writing a 250kbps n/8/2 serial receiver to drive ws2812 LED's - fits perfectly in 1k and runs like a dream at 9.6mhz

john1993


the new board should have all the supporting hardware found on the Uno board.


fungus promini is the only one that comes even close to fitting the bill here. it never ceases to amaze me how far off base some of the suggestions get on these forums. i often wonder if these guys live on the same planet. or the same universe even.

CrossRoads

All the supporting hardware including the 5V and 3.3V regulators?
If just 5V, or just 3.3V, then a promini with added FTDI Basic or clone equivalent supplying can do USB and the 20 IO with limited current for 5V and 3.3V for the processor and some external components.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

john1993

im convinced built-in USB serves virtually no purpose at all for "permanent" stand alone stage. if noobs dont know how to use a $1 ebay serial adapter or arduinoisp then better stay safe and sound in uno-land.

CrossRoads

I agree with USB, I usually just have an FTDI header for connecting a USB/Serial adapter for debug purposes, then unplug it when done downloading/debugging & ready to go embedded.
You can see that here on the '1284P derivative board that I offer with a FTDI Basic clone from tinyosshop.com
http://www.crossroadsfencing.com/BobuinoRev17/



Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

john1993

oh yeah... i inherited an original  bobduino some time back but that is much closer to "my kinda" board. sort of a promini-plus-plus... plus.

mrburnette


I am a newbie to the Arduino family.  I would like to know which board I can use that is smaller and cheaper than the Uno once I develop a project that I would like to make permanent.  Preferably the new board should have all the supporting hardware found on the Uno board.  Thanks for any help on this.


Tony:
Lots of good suggestions ahead of my entry, but your question really needs to be cast to your final design before you can get a true answer to your needs. Consider:
- If your design uses both 5V and a small current 3.3V need, then the 3.3V regulator is required.  Most designs will not use the Arduino 3.3V because it is too current limited.
- If you do not need the ability to reprogram the device, then onboard serial adapter (32U2 or FTDI) is probably not required and just eats up current when not being utilized.  However, some designs do need to keep the simplicity of end-user USB update via notebook in place to support remote support for the system.
- A 32U4 design like the Pro-mini may be a better overall approach as the USB-serial interface is intrinsic to the uC.

Bottom line here is you need to do some serious thinking about how you intend on supporting your final, end-user product.  The end game should drive the hardware requirements as much as the software and interfacing requirements.  Unless your production quantities are large enough to support your designing a board, producing it, stuffing it, and baking it you are going to be hard-pressed to reach a unit cost (if you include your/family/friend labor) of the Chinese clone boards.  You can always monitor your initial sales and plan a cut-over to your own production board should your revenue stream justify such a move.

Example of Chinese units I have used with success (not a recommendation for product purchase or vendor.)
Pro-Micro: http://www.ebay.com/itm/400512891318
Pro-Mini:  http://www.ebay.com/itm/311065690969
Nano: http://www.ebay.com/itm/201156622276   (USB == CH340)
Nano: http://www.ebay.com/itm/281041059063  (USB == FTDI)

One of the biggest issue I see with the less experienced Arduino users is the problems associated with the inexpensive Chinese Arduino (and the real Italian units, too) that are 5V @16MHz when trying to interface with 3.3V I/O.  Most makers simply refuse to do the job right and end up either getting frustrated or cooking a GLCD or sensor or even the Arduino.  You can simply avoid such issues IF your project does not require the full bandwidth of 16MHz... that is, consider 3.3V Arduino @8MHz as an option.  Examples:
https://www.sparkfun.com/products/11114
https://www.sparkfun.com/products/10914
https://www.sparkfun.com/products/12587

If you do not understand what I am discussing about voltage-level translation, then read:
https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/using-the-logic-level-converter/hardware-overview

One final recommendation: develop on what you intend on deploying!  If you 'think' you can get away with a clone xyz board in the final design to the customer, then write your software and do your bench design based upon the xyz clone and NOT another board.  You will save hair by using this philosophy.


Good luck,
Ray

See my toys: http://www.hackster.io/rayburne/

pentius

I'd stick with the good ol' Pro Mini. The Inland brand FTDI works just fine to program it. As far as the Tiny-duino, Teensy, etc. these get dicey. You'll have to download add-on files to program them like you do the RFduino. And that built-in USB (like the Leonardo) is nothing but a source of aggravation and not worth it. Companies are adopting that to save a dime by editing out a little chip.

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