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Topic: Smaller substitute for Arduino uno (Read 8111 times) previous topic - next topic

Coding Badly

As far as the ... Teensy, etc. these get dicey.


Bullshit.  I have extensively used half-a-dozen Teensys and I have never had a problem.

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You'll have to download add-on files to program them like you do the RFduino.


You believe it's a problem to download Teensyduino, a single installation program, run it, and click a few buttons?  Wow.  You are unbelievably lazy.  I wonder how you managed to get the Arduino IDE installed.

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And that built-in USB (like the Leonardo) is nothing but a source of aggravation and not worth it.


I have no idea if the built-in USB on the Leonardo is a an aggravation but it is not with the Teensy boards.

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Companies are adopting that to save a dime by editing out a little chip.


That is one possibility.  The other is that it's an effective solution for some projects.

Barry914

Nobody mentioned the Micro, my current go-to.  I wonder why.

abqlewis

#17
Sep 25, 2014, 10:41 pm Last Edit: Sep 25, 2014, 10:51 pm by Coding Badly Reason: 1
This is an important, relevant question.  Unfortunately, it's not an easy, one answer question.  The board you pick really depends on the kind of project you're building.

I list the boards I've used below, along with an example of a project I used them for.

First off - Even though you can buy most of these cheap on ebay, I would order your first one from a local, reputable site (sparkfun, adafruit, PJRC) instead.  A lot of the eBay boards take a long time to arrive, and have a noticeable failure rate. This can make building and debugging a real pain (is it my problem or is the board bad?).  Also, if you need help, you'll get much better support from the locals.  When you're more experienced, you can order cheap boards off eBay in bulk.

Pro Mini

 This board is meant for a project that does not need to be constantly connected to a PC (USB).  This is my most used project Arduino.  Not having a FTDI onboard saves money, space and power.  You have to buy a separate serial cable or board for programming or debug, but it starts to save after a few projects.

 Example: My first Sous Vide controller was a scratch built, through-hole, Arduino.  My next one used a Pro Mini. Muuuuch easier!  It doesn't stay hooked up to a PC all the time, but I can update the firmware, or datalog the temperature profile of a cook.

Nano

 If your project will remain connected to a PC through the USB port as a serial device, then a Nano can work for you.

 Example: Temp and Humidity Datalogger connected to an office PC. Any project that I just want a simple terminal interface to.
 
Teensy

 If your project uses USB other than the default serial USB of an Arduino, I like using the Teensy.
 You could use the Micro or Micro Pro, but I personally like the way Teensyduino is implemented.  
 You even get a choice of Teensy : 2.0 for Arduino compatibility - 3.1 for higher speed and I/O count (but still fairly Arduino compatible).

 Example:  Game controller (Joystick). Accessible keyboard & mouse controller.  Prank keyboard.

Build your own

  Unless you have a weird physical layout, or a specific need, it doesn't really pay to make your own Arduino for a project.  With some of these boards as low as 3-7 bucks, most people can't buy the bare parts that cheaply.  Also, if you mount the board on headers, you can swap it out quickly if one fails.
  That being said, EVERYONE should build an Arduino from scratch at least once.  You learn so much doing this.  I just don't make it into the whole project anymore.
 
Others

  There's just far too many of these different smaller boards (Trinket, TinyDuino, Digispark, etc, etc) to discuss them here.

dave-in-nj


I am a newbie to the Arduino family.  I would like to know which board I can use that is smaller and cheaper than the Uno once I develop a project that I would like to make permanent.  Preferably the new board should have all the supporting hardware found on the Uno board.  Thanks for any help on this.


so the requirement is
-smaller
-cheaper
-UNO
-all the supporting hardware found on the UNO

the mini/micro/pro-mini do not have all the hardware.   you have to use a separate way to program.

As was noted you can buy one board and program all the chips.  Although that does not meet the specs, it is a possible option.

The NANO has on-board USB ,. so that comes pretty close.   very limited 3.3v out (40mA?)

when I laid out the board to plug into my motherboard, I started with the UNO pin-out.  figure it could be a shield.
then tried to drop in the pro-mini,  most of the pins do not even come close to lining up.  seems that design is plug in for the BasicStamp.

The NANO is very close to the same pin-out, so all but one trace was straight out to the Uno pins.








bperrybap

tonyT40 you have given us an ambiguous and potentially impossible
set of requirements.
Until you further qualify what:

Preferably the new board should have all the supporting hardware found on the Uno board.


means, there is no way to make any sort of recommendations.

What do you really need in the board?
(again, think what you truly need vs want)
Things that make substantial difference:
- processor
- shield compatibility
- 3v/5v

--- bill

hiduino

I think the OP got scared away... :smiley-eek:

Paul__B


I think the OP got scared away...

Typical "drive-by" artist.

Well, there has been an interesting discussion at least.

I tend to avoid (not always successfully  :smiley-eek:) giving a detailed answer to a "single post wonder".  The first thing to reply with is "what do you actually want to do?" - since they rarely say.  If they come back and explain, then they are presumably worth the effort.  :D

Barry914

OK, so I won't feel guilty for hijacking this thread.  Anybody have an opinion as to why I see many suppliers of Pro Minis and Nanos on ebay, but very few suppliers of Micros?  It's just curiosity that makes me ask, as I have bought several Micros from a supplier that is cheaper than the few I saw on ebay.

ian332isport


The NANO has on-board USB ,. so that comes pretty close.   very limited 3.3v out (40mA?)


5v out on the NANO.

Ian.

mrburnette


OK, so I won't feel guilty for hijacking this thread.  Anybody have an opinion as to why I see many suppliers of Pro Minis and Nanos on ebay, but very few suppliers of Micros?  It's just curiosity that makes me ask, as I have bought several Micros from a supplier that is cheaper than the few I saw on ebay.


Opinion: Inventory and profit... Ability to do midnight runs while paying off the night security guards.  I was able to purchase 20 of the Micros recently for ProMini price simply because the antistatic packaging was mismarked.  My guess is a significant quantity of the low-cost boards are coming from "dark" factories.


Ray

Paul__B


OK, so I won't feel guilty for hijacking this thread.

Certainly not!


Anybody have an opinion as to why I see many suppliers of Pro Minis and Nanos on eBay, but very few suppliers of Micros?

OK, fact is, everybody tends to talk about - and newbies are directed toward - the UNO as the "flagship" product.  In the "full size" area, the UNO is predominant compared to the Leonardo.  I am sure the sales figures reflect this strongly.  When you progress to using the more compact versions, the Pro Minis and Nanos correspond to the UNO while the Nano corresponds to the Leonardo, so the lesser popularity of the Micro is simply the reflected product of the two "trends".

Other than the larger bootloader and core support for USB serial in sketches, the performance of the Leonardo is supposed to be identical to the UNO, so the comparative popularity is largely a matter of fashion.  Mind you, there seems to be a problem with the Leonardo/ Micro on Linux (noted on other threads) - I have not yet been able to use them myself, though I have not tried too hard yet.


Opinion: Inventory and profit... Ability to do midnight runs while paying off the night security guards.  ... My guess is a significant quantity of the low-cost boards are coming from "dark" factories.

I suspect China works a trifle differently to the way we view things.  They may well run factories 24 hours anyway.  I imagine (Just imagine, mind you) that it is quite normal practice that a factory will be producing modules for what we consider the legitimate distribution channel, and with exactly the same run (as: why change anything?), modules for the "dark" suppliers.  Clearly, that is the most efficient way to do things and they do nothing if not value efficiency.   :D

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