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Topic: I'm a noob!! Trying to sync multiple Arduinos. (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

rockafirelover

Hello all!

I'm VERY new to the world of programming, and especially Arduino. What i am trying to achieve is an animatronic show consisting of seven characters, each animatronic character using its own board. I'm wondering if it was possible to sync seven boards together to run with each other. I would like for them to operate in one program, instead of each board needing its own. I'm planning on using solenoid operated pneumatic valves for the movements.

Here is an example if interested:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsqKLT4v4x0&list=UUiSNpgCJpr4pYLlo3O_BzdA

Thank you for your time and advice!

-Bobby Marshall

zoomkat

You should be able to have a master controller/board that sends the individual commands to the slave boards.
Google forum search: Use Google Search box in upper right side of this page.
Why I like my 2005 Rio Yellow Honda S2000  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWjMvrkUqX0

rockafirelover

So, I could wire a Arduino board to a similar board and control about sixteen movements off a board that is getting its commands from another Arduino board?

zoomkat

So, I could wire a Arduino board to a similar board and control about sixteen movements off a board that is getting its commands from another Arduino board?
You should be able to that. I suggest you get two arduinos, one as master and one as slave, and start doing some communications testing between the two.

 
Google forum search: Use Google Search box in upper right side of this page.
Why I like my 2005 Rio Yellow Honda S2000  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWjMvrkUqX0

justone

OK you got seven figurines with how many outputs per each? 5, 10 , 20 ?

Why pneumatic (total hardware could really add up costs)? What are you moving that would need that kind of force?

How far apart are they?

Your link (is this new forum problems) is not working.


rockafirelover

I prefer pneumatic because I can control the speed and force of the movements, such as I can have a arm that will hit a drum really slam down on it, but I can keep a eye turn or blink at a slow speed without changing the hardware. The cost i'm keeping down by using used parts or fabricating my own. And i also chose pneumatic because it will be easier to animate using simple on/off movements.

The maximum amount of movement I plan on is about eighteen movements on one figure.

They are about four, five, or six inches from each other.

That's okay! If you really want to know what i'm talking about just search "Rock Afire Explosion" on YouTube.

Thank you!

-Bobby Marshall

rockafirelover

OK you got seven figurines with how many outputs per each? 5, 10 , 20 ?

Why pneumatic (total hardware could really add up costs)? What are you moving that would need that kind of force?

How far apart are they?

Your link (is this new forum problems) is not working.


My apologies if this is a double post. Still learning on here. :P

I prefer pneumatic because I can control the speed and force of the movements, such as I can have a arm that will hit a drum really slam down on it, but I can keep a eye turn or blink at a slow speed without changing the hardware. The cost i'm keeping down by using used parts or fabricating my own. And i also chose pneumatic because it will be easier to animate using simple on/off movements.

The maximum amount of movement I plan on is about eighteen movements on one figure.

They are about four, five, or six inches from each other.

That's okay! If you really want to know what i'm talking about just search "Rock Afire Explosion" on YouTube.

Thank you!

-Bobby Marshall

wildbill

Two or three Megas should give you enough I/O. You could have the designated master Mega signal to each slave that it's time to start with a digital I/O line apiece. If you were prepared to have each Mega run its own unique program to control some of the figurines, synchronizing the start would probably be close enough. Over time the timers will wander a bit, but not enough to matter I suspect.

It would be tedious testing and continuously reloading the code to adjust timings, although I assume you're already used to that. A slightly less painful method might be to equip the master with an SD card and devise a little file format that allows you to specify when, which Arduino, which pin, on or off. Let the master read this data and send what's appropriate to each slave over serial at a high baud rate.

Let the slaves buffer a bunch of instructions and have the master send another set later on. Either controlled by time or when the slave asks for it.

If you wanted to get more fancy, you could put some control statements in the file and in effect devise a specialist programming language to drive your figurines. 

 

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