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Topic: Forum issues tracker on GitHub (Read 4271 times) previous topic - next topic

nickgammon

Forum issues are now publicly available for tracking on GitHub: arduino/forum-issues

You can see there existing issues which have been entered, and what progress is being made on them.

Please search for an existing issue similar to one you are concerned with, before opening a new issue, because a lot of virtually identical issues will just slow down their ability to respond to them.

To add issues (or comment on them) you will need a GitHub account (this is free).
Please post technical questions on the forum, not by personal message. Thanks!

More info: http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics


smeezekitty

#2
Oct 29, 2014, 11:40 pm Last Edit: Oct 29, 2014, 11:45 pm by smeezekitty
This is a big step in the right direction.

Although the text from the basecamp entries should be brought over
Avoid throwing electronics out as you or someone else might need them for parts or use.
Solid state rectifiers are the only REAL rectifiers.
Resistors for LEDS!

mastrolinux

I am converting all basecamp entries in github issues directly. I need some time. Nothing should be obscure other than live security issues.

Robin2

I fully accept that Github is "flavour of the month" with programming folks so I have no intention of arguing that the tracker should be elsewhere.

I like very much that we can see th Github list - that is a huge step forward.

However I would also prefer that, in general, issues are raised here in the Website section of the Forum in the first instance and then probably added to the Github list by one of the background team or by an administrator. I don't see any need for "ordinary folks" like me to input stuff to the Github list.

There are a few associated reasons for this.

I want to see the background team take a genuine and routine interest in this section of the Forum. If they do that they will easily pick up issues that need to be added to the Github list.

The Forum provides an opportunity to discuss issues before they get put on the list. And I want the background team to participate in those discussions. The Forum also provides a space to discuss decisions about the priority of things on the list.

I don't want to see Github become the Forum about the Forum. One Forum is plenty.

Normally there are not many posts in this section of the Forum so what I am asking is not very onerous.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

mastrolinux

Github is very useful to have a clear list of issues and organize them. It is very useful for developer and they are already used to it.

I agree on discussing issues here, than we can move them to Github once they are completely defined.

nickgammon

I don't want to see Github become the Forum about the Forum. One Forum is plenty.
Yes, but it isn't a forum. It is, or should be, a place where clearly-defined problems, or suggestions, are posted, with supporting documentation (eg. links, screenshots). It is not a place for asking questions, seeking guidance, telling jokes, or anything like that.

I have been posting quite a few issues recently, that I either personally detected, or that I spotted someone else talking about. GitHub is a formal place for such things to be placed, and then someone is assigned (not be me, I don't have that power) to deal with it. Once it is dealt with a commit should be raised, and the problem fixed.

Forum threads, but their nature, can tend to waffle, and it can be hard for a developer, who is working to a tight schedule, and who is under pressure, to work their way through multiple threads to try to find out what is wrong, if indeed anything is, and the best fix for it. And whether a particular problem is high priority or not.
Please post technical questions on the forum, not by personal message. Thanks!

More info: http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

nickgammon

Just as an example, and I don't want to get into details, some issues I raised (and I wasn't the only one) don't have anyone assigned to them yet. This level of detail is not available on the forum (whether someone is working on something) and it is helpful to see how issues are being progressed.

Looking at some of the commit diffs on GitHub, it is clear that what may seem to us to be a simple problem, can involve hundreds of lines of PHP code to implement. And prior to formal implementation, to test.

I am personally pleased that there is an element of formality to this, because I think this concentrates the developers' minds onto working in sequence through problems, in priority order.
Please post technical questions on the forum, not by personal message. Thanks!

More info: http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

Robin2

Just as an example, and I don't want to get into details, some issues I raised (and I wasn't the only one) don't have anyone assigned to them yet. This level of detail is not available on the forum (whether someone is working on something) and it is helpful to see how issues are being progressed.
Sorry if I wasn't clear - and maybe I also confused @Mastrolinux.

Yes Github should be used by the team to manage the issues - as @Mastrolinux says "they are already used to it." I thought I had acknowledged that in the first sentence of Reply #4.

All I am trying to say is that the Forum is the place where ordinary users should raise issues and where the team should expect to find them. And where they should report completion of issues. I am quite happy if things only get onto Github after they have been assessed by a more "senior" person - and admin, or a member of the team..

What I do like is being able to view the Github list - but I have no wish to be able to add to it, or modify it, or comment directly in Github. This Forum is the place for comments.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Robin2

#9
Nov 01, 2014, 11:06 am Last Edit: Nov 01, 2014, 11:07 am by Robin2
Looking at some of the commit diffs on GitHub, it is clear that what may seem to us to be a simple problem, can involve hundreds of lines of PHP code to implement.
I have responded to this separately because I am flabbergasted.

I though the Arduino folk acquired/bought the SMF forum software and clicked a few option boxes to set it running. Maybe added a couple of stylesheets to get the colours correctly.

Why on earth are they using something that needs that level of additional programming?

if the problems we have been experiencing have arisen because someone got a working system and then decided to FIX it I have even less sympathy than I had previously.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

smeezekitty

Quote
All I am trying to say is that the Forum is the place where ordinary users should raise issues and where the team should expect to find them
Ordinary people can easily add issues to github and comment
Creating an account is trivial

It is much easier for the admins to keep track of it like that. I have already posted several issues to Hoggin and they have been commented/addressed promptly
Avoid throwing electronics out as you or someone else might need them for parts or use.
Solid state rectifiers are the only REAL rectifiers.
Resistors for LEDS!

Robin2

Ordinary people can easily add issues to github and comment
Creating an account is trivial
In my view that is the problem -  not the solution.

I don't like the idea that I have to read both this Forum and Github to see all the issues and the discussion about them. This potentially creates the same problem of double-posting that we routinely complain about in the Forum.

I would much prefer if the Github account was read-only for ordinary forum users like me.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

PaulS

Quote
I would much prefer if the Github account was read-only for ordinary forum users like me.
It is read-only until you create an account. Even then, I think you need to specifically be added to some list to get write permission.
The art of getting good answers lies in asking good questions.

Robin2

It is read-only until you create an account. Even then, I think you need to specifically be added to some list to get write permission.
I don't get that impression from reply #10

I would be quite happy if people need to be on a list and if the list is restricted to Admins and team members.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

smeezekitty

Why so much griping?

This is basically how bug tracking works in almost every other open source program.

Github appears to be working fine. And yes anybody can write to it. The purpose
is to have community participation and bug reports
Avoid throwing electronics out as you or someone else might need them for parts or use.
Solid state rectifiers are the only REAL rectifiers.
Resistors for LEDS!

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