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Topic: Soldering Temp / Fixing Trace (Read 10549 times) previous topic - next topic

KenF

What is your main reason why you don't you like the idea? If you live in a house with plumbing older than 1986, your drinking water pipes were almost certainly soldered with leaded solder, remember that every time you have a drink ;)
Up until I was 10 years old ALL the water that I drank was delivered to the taps through lead pipes.  It's actually the reason that the latin for lead (plumbum) has the same root as "plumbing"

adele

Well I'm going to try it. I will post back later in the week after I get the stuff and let you know if it works any better.

Thanks.

KenF

Well I'm going to try it. I will post back later in the week after I get the stuff and let you know if it works any better.
It will :)

ghlawrence2000

After EVERYTHING from all these people, you are still not convinced..... Hmmmmm. If you don't want advice, don't ask for it?  :smiley-mr-green:

Best wishes,

Graham
UTFT_SdRaw now included in library manager!! ;) High speed image drawing from SD card to UTFT displays for Mega & DUE.
UTFT_GHL - a VASTLY upgraded version of UTFT_CTE. Coming soon to a TFT near you! 8) Shipping April 1 2016!

Tkrain

The only reason to work with Lead Free Solder is if you're building a board for a customer who has ROHS requirements.  I work at a professional board assembly facility and I can't name one person there who likes working with Lead Free Solder.  It's harder to flow, significantly harder to desolder, it's more expensive, and it doesn't look as good when your product's finished.  Don't get me wrong, we use it on about 1/3rd of the orders we produce, and when the order comes in, we do it.  We definitely prefer the good old leaded solder, though.  Personally, I'm not convinced that the lead free stuff is any safer than the leaded alternatives, but it -=is=- ROHS compliant.

I don't think anybody is saying to take your spool of Lead Free and toss it in the trash can, but especially while you're learning, do yourself a huge favor and switch to leaded.

Foggiest

Have to giggle a little at the potential dangers of using a leaded solder (It is a material to be respected!).
No one seemed to notice the use of adhesives to repair the damaged pad.

Be VERY careful doing this, EG superglue contains cyanide, I wouldn't hang around to find out what is given off if this compound meets a hot soldering iron.

nilton61

Have you guys ever heard of ROHS directive? Have you ever wondered what becomes of old electronics?
Soldering lead free is different from soldering leaded but not necessarily harder although it can seem so for anyone accustomed to leaded solder.
The secret to a good solder joint is as always:
  • Heat the entire joint to the right temperature as quickly as possible. This requires i soldering tool with high power and good regulation. It also requires careful tip placement so that the heat can spread to all parts of the joint
  • Let the flux do its job before applying the solder. This can involve using a separate flux pen or just applying a little solder where the tip meets the joint. This also helps spread the heat more quickly.

Coding Badly


Quote
...unless you eat the stuff it's not going to poison you.
Which means wash your hands after handling it.  Especially if you have children or pets.  And keep it in a closed container / out of reach so children and pets can't get to it.


Foggiest

Have you guys ever heard of ROHS directive? Have you ever wondered what becomes of old electronics?
Soldering lead free is different from soldering leaded but not necessarily harder although it can seem so for anyone accustomed to leaded solder.

Sorry, but this is incorrect.

Lead free solder is inferior in every way that counts.
It is harder to work with IMHE (I have some experience with soldering)
The joint is not as mechanically strong
The joint is not as chemically/crystalline stable

Make something properly with leaded solder and it will not hit he landfill for nearly half a century (HP bench gear, Yaesu ft101 etc)
Make something properly with leadfree, it lots of it will hit the landfill within 15 years.

nilton61

That's a strange remark since there are no more exceptions from the ROHS directive which means that even life-support and aerospace electronics are soldered lead free. Any way, most electronic devices will be outdated in 15 years anyway and will have to be recycled. The concept of a landfill should be even more outdated.

Coding Badly

Quote
Lead free solder is inferior in every way that counts.
Some are.  Some aren't.  According to people who test and report such things (NIST).


Foggiest

That's a strange remark since there are no more exceptions from the ROHS directive which means that even life-support and aerospace electronics are soldered lead free. Any way, most electronic devices will be outdated in 15 years anyway and will have to be recycled. The concept of a landfill should be even more outdated.
It was you that called the end destination as a supporting argument to your side!?

I wouldn't know about life support, and haven't been near MOD work for decades.

To all intents and purpose, here on this forum, leaded solder is superior.
Stating aerospace and military practices is not relevant to the context, like turning up at a welding class and negating the lesson because all formula one cars are now kevlar.

IMVHO

nilton61

Every piece of electronic equipment i bought the last 5 years had a RoHS sticker on it. That means no lead (look at your arduino board). Face the facts, lead is harmful in both short and long terms both for the individual and for the environment and unnecessary. And legislature in the Eu forbids it. It is fully possible to achieve solder joints that adhere to IPC standards even for an amateur given the right equipment and the right practice.

Foggiest

Every piece of electronic equipment i bought the last 5 years had a RoHS sticker on it. That means no lead (look at your arduino board). Face the facts, lead is harmful in both short and long terms both for the individual and for the environment and unnecessary. And legislature in the Eu forbids it. It is fully possible to achieve solder joints that adhere to IPC standards even for an amateur given the right equipment and the right practice.
No, again the ROHS compliance is for COMMERCIAL products, that is why you see stickers.
Anything you make is your own business, and for that matter small commercial runs of leaded aren't exactly going to set off alarms at the CIA!

This banging on about the harm of lead is just falling for the political crap blindly.
I have explained how lead free halves the life and therefore pollutes twice as much.

nilton61

I remember seeing the same flawed arguments being presented in the debates regarding asbestos, unleaded fuel and so on.

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