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Topic: IP cam won't work using regulated IC and a battery (Read 3282 times) previous topic - next topic

xiaram

Hello Everyone! Newbie here

Can anyone help on making my IP cam work. I have an IP cam that i want to mount on my wifi controlled robotic car project. The IP cam have an adapter which have an output dc voltage of 5v and 1.2A current. What I tried to do was to make the IP cam work on using my rechargeable battery with 12v and initial current less than 1.6A then using its output to regulate to 5v using a IC regulator. But the IP cam didn't work. If anyone here could give me any suggestions will be very useful.

PS. I tried the same method and battery but with another 9v regulated IC for the router which is 9v == 600mA and it works fine.

zoomkat

Quote
But the IP cam didn't work. I
Did you recheck you wiring? What type of regulator chip are you using? What is the voltage output of the regulator chip when the cam is connected to it? A 5v UBEC like below would probably make for an efficient regulator setup for the cam power.

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_sacat=0&_sop=15&_nkw=ubec+5v&rt=nc&LH_BIN=1
Google forum search: Use Google Search box in upper right side of this page.
Why I like my 2005 Rio Yellow Honda S2000  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWjMvrkUqX0

MarkT

You expect us to understand your problem better than you without
telling us which IP cam model you have?  Better post all the details of your
hardware if you want informed answers.  Details matter and details cannot
be guessed.

Please do read the sticky threads about posting, it saves everyone time and
confusion and you get better answers quicker.... 
[ I will NOT respond to personal messages, I WILL delete them, use the forum please ]

xiaram

Did you recheck you wiring? What type of regulator chip are you using? What is the voltage output of the regulator chip when the cam is connected to it? A 5v UBEC like below would probably make for an efficient regulator setup for the cam power.

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_sacat=0&_sop=15&_nkw=ubec+5v&rt=nc&LH_BIN=1
Im using a 7805 IC regulator with caps. The capacitor before the voltage regulator is a 25v 10uF and another 10v 1uF capacitor after the voltage regulator. Note that they are all parallel to the regulator. Is there any wrong on that circuit?

And regarding on the 5v UBEC, I'm not sure if its available here. If ever i will order it I think it will took a long time to arrive. I think I will stick on the voltage regulator.

xiaram

You expect us to understand your problem better than you without
telling us which IP cam model you have?  Better post all the details of your
hardware if you want informed answers.  Details matter and details cannot
be guessed.

Please do read the sticky threads about posting, it saves everyone time and
confusion and you get better answers quicker.... 
I'm very sorry about that....
By the way, this is the specs of the IP cam... http://www.cnet.com/products/d-link-dcs-930l-wireless-n-network-camera/specs/

The battery specs... http://www.parts-express.com/panasonic-12v-72ah-sealed-lead-acid-battery--140-465

The voltage regulator datasheet... http://www.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/pdf/99445/FAIRCHILD/KA7805.html

And about the working router. Here is its specs... http://www.tenda.cn/tendacn/product/show.aspx?productid=404

And the voltage regulator I used for the router... http://www.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/pdf/22639/STMICROELECTRONICS/L7809CV.html

I'm very sorry for the lack of details. My bad...

Zapro

You need to use a Switching regulator for that!

Using an 78xx or any linear regulator, it throws away the extra voltage as heat. If you are pulling 1 Amp at the output of the voltage reulator (at 5 Volts) it is burning off 7 WATTS OF POWER! You need an enormuous heatsink to keep that regulator cool and happy, and you'll waste over 50% of the battery power to heat, not powering the camera. Yo do not want that.

Get something like this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/301218533352 (there is a shitload of them on eBay)...

// Per.

MarkT

Quote
What I tried to do was to make the IP cam work on using my rechargeable battery with 12v and initial current less than 1.6A then using its output to regulate to 5v using a IC regulator. But the IP cam didn't work.
Well obviously, the camera requires 5V only, you have a mains supply generating 5V
and a 12V battery - what exactly did you do?  Hopefully you didn't put 12V on the
camera directly?
[ I will NOT respond to personal messages, I WILL delete them, use the forum please ]

zoomkat

The wireless IP cams take a good bit of power, your cam links say the power requirements are DC 5 V - 1.2 A . With your 7805 chip setup measure the output voltage, then connect the cam and see if the voltage stays at 5v or significantly drops (the large 7805 chips are good for about 1A). I haven't run two 7805 chips in parallel, but it might be possible to supply the required current.
Google forum search: Use Google Search box in upper right side of this page.
Why I like my 2005 Rio Yellow Honda S2000  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWjMvrkUqX0

xiaram

You need to use a Switching regulator for that!

Using an 78xx or any linear regulator, it throws away the extra voltage as heat. If you are pulling 1 Amp at the output of the voltage reulator (at 5 Volts) it is burning off 7 WATTS OF POWER! You need an enormuous heatsink to keep that regulator cool and happy, and you'll waste over 50% of the battery power to heat, not powering the camera. Yo do not want that.

Get something like this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/301218533352 (there is a shitload of them on eBay)...

// Per.
Yes! I'm thinking that might be the problem also. So, I'm trying to make a variable voltage regulator to see if it will work. I will update if this gonna solve my problem.

xiaram

Well obviously, the camera requires 5V only, you have a mains supply generating 5V
and a 12V battery - what exactly did you do?  Hopefully you didn't put 12V on the
camera directly?
I don't, I use the 5v voltage regulator after the 12v battery then to the camera.

Paul__B

#10
Jan 04, 2015, 06:07 am Last Edit: Jan 04, 2015, 06:09 am by Paul__B Reason: Emphasis
So, I'm trying to make a variable voltage regulator to see if it will work. I will update if this gonna solve my problem.
Why would you want to "make" a variable voltage regulator?  You specifically want a fixed 5V regulator, and for that current it really wants to be a switchmode one as was suggested to you above.  You do not want it to be variable to any other than 5V, and a switchmode regulator is all the more essential if you are going to power it from a battery.

And ... building switchmode regulators as such is certainly not for the inexperienced.

xiaram

#11
Jan 04, 2015, 06:43 am Last Edit: Jan 04, 2015, 06:52 am by xiaram
The wireless IP cams take a good bit of power, your cam links say the power requirements are DC 5 V - 1.2 A . With your 7805 chip setup measure the output voltage, then connect the cam and see if the voltage stays at 5v or significantly drops (the large 7805 chips are good for about 1A).
I will try to measure it. I'm also guessing that either of the voltage or current is lacking here.


xiaram

I haven't run two 7805 chips in parallel, but it might be possible to supply the required current.
I see my cam needs a 1.2A of current while the IC only provides 1A. My bad, I didn't see that. So, is it possible to use two parallel voltage regulator inorder to increase the current? It's my first time to hear that. I see that here.. http://www.instructables.com/id/Increasing-current-on-78xx-series-regulators/?ALLSTEPS

and I also see this.. http://www.zen22142.zen.co.uk/Circuits/Power/boosti.htm

What is good between the two?

xiaram

Why would you want to "make" a variable voltage regulator?  You specifically want a fixed 5V regulator, and for that current it really wants to be a switchmode one as was suggested to you above.  You do not want it to be variable to any other than 5V, and a switchmode regulator is all the more essential if you are going to power it from a battery.

And ... building switchmode regulators as such is certainly not for the inexperienced.
My bad, I will first test and measure the voltage and current supply of the voltage regulator.

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