Go Down

Topic: Powering Arduino from a power bank (Read 50764 times) previous topic - next topic

Grumpy_Mike

Quote
plus whatever current is necessary to satisfy the arduino (very very little).
An Arduino Uno takes about 30mA so it is much bigger than your 5mA from a resistor. I think the trip out point is closer to 100mA for the power bank I have.

Johan_Ha

#31
May 05, 2019, 06:55 pm Last Edit: May 05, 2019, 09:00 pm by Johan_Ha
I just tested a gmini 5200 mAh power bank. It seems to shut off after 24 s.
12 mA is not enough to keep it on, but 17 mA is. In other words, a 400 Ohm load is not keeping it on, but 300 Ohm does the job. A 100 ms pulse of 17 mA every 20 second keeps the power on. The power won't go on just by connecting it to something that would draw more than 17 mA. Only the button on the PB can turn the 5  V on.

Next test is with an Anker Astro E1 power bank. This one behaves strangely. Even 25 mA is not enough to keep it on. While on, it stays on for 30 s. When off, connecting a 300 Ohm resistor will turn it on, but it won't stay on even if the 300 Ohm is left on. I can't figure out how big current is required for it to stay on. This PB is probably only for charging. I bet it stays on, if the initial current is over 1000 mA (it can deliver 2000 mA) and then the current fades with an even rate, as it would, when a phone actually is charged. So an uneven load caused by an Arduino and a few servos and a timed small 50 mA peak might not keep this PB awake. Which is strange, because I got this PB in a Raspberry Pi set. Perhaps the Raspberry Pi draws continuously enough to keep the Anker PB awake.

The conclusion is that a gmini GM-PB052L works fine with an Arduino, if you just give it an extra load of 300 Ohm (17 mA) for 100 ms every 20 s.
____________________

If you ask for help and write 'u' instead of 'you' because you think it's convenient, I will write 'no' instead of 'yes'. For same reasons.

Johan_Ha

#32
May 05, 2019, 08:59 pm Last Edit: May 05, 2019, 09:11 pm by Johan_Ha
Turns out my Arduino clone, which is a 4duino pro, draws 15 mA, when it just runs a dumb program without anything attached to the pins. This is enough to keep the gmini PB running, without any extra timed load. But even a constant 38 mA is not enough to keep the Anker PB running. Another board of mine, a Netduino Ethernet, draws 110 mA, when nothing is connected to it. This is enough for the Anker PB to stay awake.
____________________

If you ask for help and write 'u' instead of 'you' because you think it's convenient, I will write 'no' instead of 'yes'. For same reasons.

EJRONIN

I just bought an ANKER 10000mAh ES1 Redux. PLugged it into an Arduino Mega 2560 Rev 3. Been quietly sitting there, on a stock (out of the box) Arduino since 10 am (i's not 4:45 pm). Hasn't powered down yet.

The next PB I'm going to test is the 26000mAh.

wvmarle

I just bought an ANKER 10000mAh ES1 Redux. PLugged it into an Arduino Mega 2560 Rev 3. Been quietly sitting there, on a stock (out of the box) Arduino since 10 am (i's not 4:45 pm). Hasn't powered down yet.
Goes to show how much power the Mega wastes...
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

voltaicjeff

We made all our power banks with an Always On mode for IoT and maker projects. They do not shut off in no or low current applications. They all recover into Always On mode after being drained, the V50 also recovers after over temperature and under temperature events.
See: https://voltaicsystems.com/v50/ and https://voltaicsystems.com/always-on/

Go Up