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Topic: Battery Supply (Read 626 times) previous topic - next topic

Bakr

I am using 3 ultrasonic sensors and a GPS module which work fine individually. But when I try to power all 4 together, none of them works.

The arduino UNO is connected to the computer and I want to buy batteries to supply the arduino with power.

What I am asking is: how could I supply enough power to the arduino to power all my sensors?

tkbyd

#1
Apr 12, 2015, 10:48 am Last Edit: Apr 12, 2015, 10:49 am by tkbyd
"What batteries" is a HUGE question, but to address just a bit of it, we need...

Working with a breadboard, I imagine?

Get connections to all of your non Arduino bits all going to one row of contacts. And use one wire from there to whereever you are getting the volts for them.

CAREFULLY... be sure it is set up for the max combined current your devices could be drawing (their datasheets will help you), interpose an ammeter (probably a multimeter set for reading current) in the path created by that wire.

(Perhaps useful.... introduction to volts/ amps/ ohms...

http://www.arunet.co.uk/tkboyd/ele1bb.htm

Boardburner2

#2
Apr 13, 2015, 02:39 am Last Edit: Apr 13, 2015, 02:40 am by Boardburner2
I am using 3 ultrasonic sensors and a GPS module which work fine individually. But when I try to power all 4 together, none of them works.

The arduino UNO is connected to the computer and I want to buy batteries to supply the arduino with power.

What I am asking is: how could I supply enough power to the arduino to power all my sensors?
Why ?

Supply detail.
What current consumption are you MEASURNG. .

tkbyd

Re-reading your question makes me worried....

Adding a source of voltage which will supply more current to a circuit that "isn't working", in case that fixes it, may just be adding enough power to melt things in a BAD circuit.

Maybe your current source of voltage is doing you a favor by "giving up".... NOT that this is a "safe" way to "test" things, unless you have a specially designed PSU that is "overload friendly", and even then is is only a bad idea, not a bad-idea-which-could-wreck-things. (Actually, things could still be wrecked, but not as many things.)

There are ways to figure out ahead of time what current SHOULD flow, and if your PSU is designed to be able to supply that much.

TomGeorge

Hi,

Can you please post a copy of your circuit, in CAD or a picture of a hand drawn circuit in jpg, png or pdf?

Can you please post a copy of your sketch, using code tags?
Please use code tags.. See section 7 http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php/topic,148850.0.html

Tom..... :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

sonyhome

would any of these sensors draw significant power? unlikely... so likely is that your wiring is wrong and you are shorting your power... imho.

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