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Topic: Control hydraulic servo valve with Arduino interface (Read 2316 times) previous topic - next topic

skippyV

Hello,
I'm asking for a sanity check on this project direction.

We are building a tool that is driven by a hydraulic pump which is controlled via a proportional directional control valve.
(Specifically a D1FX 30 Series valve from Parker. Model#:D1FXE01HCNBJ00)

Since we already use Arduino's to capture data via RS-485, we would like to use an Arduino as an interface to provide the PWM signals to the valve.

The valve's command signal range is +-10 volts.

The idea is to program the Arduino so that it would generate a PWM signal upon command.
A software application on the PC would receive data on the tool's motion and issue commands to the Arduino to adjust that motion as needed.
But the Arduino PWM signal would have to be converted into the valve's range.

Ideally we'd want the highest step resolution (0 to 255) for both the positive and negative side.
But how would one create a circuit to accomplish the interface between the Arduino and the valve?

If another Arduino output pin value controlled the polarity then maybe it would work...
And I'd probably have to control the frequency of the modulation...

Or is this just the wrong approach altogether? 

Thanks for any insight.

zoomkat

Quote
Ideally we'd want the highest step resolution (0 to 255) for both the positive and negative side.
But how would one create a circuit to accomplish the interface between the Arduino and the valve?
An H-bridge might work for your situation as you have explained it.
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MorganS

I'm working on a project that is using a similar 0-10V industrial valve. So far I've identified two methods of boosting the Arduino 5V up to 10V.

1. PWM a MOSFET attached to a higher voltage.
Just use a 10-12V regulated supply and a simple high-side MOSFET switching circuit to PWM the high voltage. Then apply R-C filtering to turn it back into analog. For extra confidence, a voltage divider will allow the Arduino analog input to monitor the output voltage and make a feedback loop. The MOSFET circuit will basically be a small logic-level N-channel MOSFET acting as a low-side switch for a P-channel MOSFET on the 12V line.

2. Convert to analog 0-5V and use an opamp configured to 2x gain.
This is also fairly easy to implement with an opamp and a higher value supply.

A voltage doubler can be used to derive the 10V supply from the Arduino 5V supply but my industrial valve requires 12V power as well, so the higher voltage is always available in my project.
"The problem is in the code you didn't post."

TomGeorge

Hi,
Usually its good to provide a link to any unique components.

http://www.parker.com/literature/Hydraulic%20Valve%20Division/hydraulicvalve/Service-Installation/Electrohydraulics/Bul%202583-M1%20D1FX%2030%20Design.pdf

Tom.... :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

skippyV

@zoomkat, thanks for the info. Sometimes you just need the right search terms.

@MorganS, Option #1 looks similar to what little I've read about H-bridge circuits... but this domain isn't my expertise so I certainly could be wrong. I have to educate myself with those circuits and then revisit your idea(s). Thank you.

@Tom, thanks for the link.  :)

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