Go Down

Topic: Can Arduino power 12v 5amp actuator  (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

Vinniex1

Hi, I've ordered a microcontroller just to test it out. While I'm waiting for it to arrive, I am wondering if the microcontroller can power a 12v 5amp actuator. I understand that the pins output 5v by default, although is there another solution to achieve 12v.

What if connected the actuator's red wire directly to a 12v source, and just connect the black wire to the arduino, and use this to control the actuator?

JimboZA

You need a transistor in between.... the transistor is the switch for the actuator's 12V, but it (the transistor) is controlled by an Arduino output at 5V.

Have a look here for the idea: others will no doubt help you spec the transistor for the required voltage and current. A logic level mosfet will likely do the job, but rather let others comment on that.

Johannesburg hams call me: ZS6JMB on Highveld rep 145.7875 (-600 & 88.5 tone)
Dr Perry Cox: "Help me to help you, help me to help you...."
Your answer may already be here: https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=384198.0

Vinniex1

Ok thanks for your comment. The mosfet looks suitable, I also found a few that were 100 volts 5 amps.

I also saw in the diagram that the resistor needs to be placed before the transistor. I would also need one after to reduce the voltage for the actuator. Is this right?

JimboZA

I would also need [a resistor] after [the transistor] to reduce the voltage for the actuator. Is this right?
Not sure what you mean: the supply to the actuator is the voltage the actuator needs (V+ in that pic), it's just switched by the transistor.
Johannesburg hams call me: ZS6JMB on Highveld rep 145.7875 (-600 & 88.5 tone)
Dr Perry Cox: "Help me to help you, help me to help you...."
Your answer may already be here: https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=384198.0

weedpharma

Why would you want to reduce the voltage from a 12 volt supply to a 12 volt motor?

Any R in series would just make the motor less efficient and waste power.

Weedpharma

russellz

Ok thanks for your comment. The mosfet looks suitable, I also found a few that were 100 volts 5 amps.
Just make sure it's a "logic level" MOSFET if you are driving it directly from the Arduino.  Oh, and don't forget the diode.

Russell.
Retired after 40 years as a chartered engineer working mostly with RF and analogue electronics.

TomGeorge

Hi,
Can you post the specs or a link to the specs and a part number for your actuator please?

Tom... :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

tonyo531

I'm curious, what are you looking to do with the actuator?

Vinniex1

Hi, thanks for all your help. Sorry about my comments, I misunderstood. I have the transistor, the guy at the shop said I didn't need a resistor as shown in the diagram, as it's a driver and output module. I also have the diode. Also for my actuator, if I send power to it, it will extend, although would I need two transistors, so on one I can reverse the polarity, making the actuator go back in, is this right?

JimboZA

Reversing the polarity needs more than just another transistor: you need an h-bridge. Search for motor driver h-bridge modules.

(But maybe your actuator is spring-loaded?- you haven't said much about it.)
Johannesburg hams call me: ZS6JMB on Highveld rep 145.7875 (-600 & 88.5 tone)
Dr Perry Cox: "Help me to help you, help me to help you...."
Your answer may already be here: https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=384198.0

TomGeorge

Hi,

Quote
 I have the transistor, the guy at the shop said I didn't need a resistor as shown in the diagram, as it's a driver and output module.
What did you get?
Part number would help.

Tom..... :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

Vinniex1

Hi, I was going to mention in the previous comment about the actuator specs. I'm just getting a cheap on off eBay to experiment. I don't think it's spring loaded as it will have to pull a gate shut, so I'm not sure how strong the springs are if it is spring loaded.

Here are the links:

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/12-039-039-Stroke-12V-Linear-Actuator-multi-purpose-Linear-Actuator-for-Industry-Car-/390942921825?_trksid=p2054897.l4275

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/12-24V-Linear-actuator-1500N-Electric-Motors-Max-load-150kg-for-auto-lifting-/261355552308?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_15&var=&hash=item3cda013e34

Vinniex1

I found a h-bridge module, looks suitable.

http://www.miniinthebox.com/l9110-dual-channel-h-bridge-motor-driver-module-for-arduino_p903443.html?currency=AUD&litb_from=paid_adwords_shopping&gclid=CL-sxcn-z8UCFVBvvAodApEAVg

Does this one support two motors, or does motor b ports give me the opportunity to reverse the wires to make the actuator go backwards?

JimboZA

Dual channel means it supports 2x motors. So you leave each motor (or in your case actuator) hooked up one way round and the bridge switches the polarity internally, under the control of two inputs from your Arduino.

So normally (I'm not familiar with your specific one) you send a high/low from two Arduino pins and get (say) clockwise (or extended for your actuator) and a low/high for anti-clockwise (or retracted).
Johannesburg hams call me: ZS6JMB on Highveld rep 145.7875 (-600 & 88.5 tone)
Dr Perry Cox: "Help me to help you, help me to help you...."
Your answer may already be here: https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=384198.0

Archibald

#14
May 20, 2015, 11:47 am Last Edit: May 20, 2015, 11:51 am by Archibald
I found a h-bridge module, looks suitable.

http://www.miniinthebox.com/l9110-dual-channel-h-bridge-motor-driver-module-for-arduino_p903443.html?currency=AUD&litb_from=paid_adwords_shopping&gclid=CL-sxcn-z8UCFVBvvAodApEAVg

Does this one support two motors, or does motor b ports give me the opportunity to reverse the wires to make the actuator go backwards?
From data of a similar product here, that will drive only up to 0.8 amps.

Where did you get the 5 amp requirement from?

Go Up