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Topic: Prototyping wire (Read 3191 times) previous topic - next topic

TomGeorge

Hi,
Cat5 cable, excellent supply if you can get the solid conductor type.

Tom.... :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

aisc

Well I found my left-over reel. Probably still about 50 metres on it, so multiply by 8 and I have at least 400m.
Now I have to find my Cat-5 crimping tool/stripper.

I stripped a bit off one core and wire is the perfect size.
One thing though, it is all copper - i.e. not tinned.
Will that cause an issue when soldered to tinned components?

Riva

One thing though, it is all copper - i.e. not tinned.
Will that cause an issue when soldered to tinned components?
Strip it as you need it to reduce oxidation and flux should take care of the rest.
Don't PM me for help as I will ignore it.

Grumpy_Mike

Quote
One thing though, it is all copper - i.e. not tinned.
Will that cause an issue when soldered to tinned components?
No the only issue will be if you leave it un-soldered and the oxides build up meaning it can't be soldered. You do it right away, lets say within a few weeks it will be fine.

aisc

No the only issue will be if you leave it un-soldered and the oxides build up meaning it can't be soldered. You do it right away, lets say within a few weeks it will be fine.
Lol I've left it for about 10 years already...
But it is still insulated and sheathed :)
I take it you mean do it right away after stripping - right?

Just did a quick test and soldered the ends of 2 strands I stripped yesterday - and it worked just fine.

But now I am thinking since the issue of oxidation has been mentioned, if I strip off the entire length before I use it, it will oxidise once installed which could mean an unsightly prototype - hmmm......

So I guess I might have to use it with only the ends stripped off, which would bring me back to the same procedure I use now i.e. measure, cut, strip, tin, solder.

I was using 5 assorted colour spools of 26 gauge multi-strand wire for prototyping.
Actually the wire is tinned but to prevent having stray strands, I "tin" the ends to keep them together.
FWIW I bought multi-strand because that is all the shop had.

I am starting to thinking solid core may be easier to use.

What does everyone else use?

Grumpy_Mike

Yes the time starts from when it is stripped, that is exposed to the atmosphere.
I use tinned copper of the type I first linked. I have it in various gauges. I bought the reels about 30 years ago and they are still going strong. Look on it as a life time investment.

Riva

#21
Aug 12, 2015, 08:27 am Last Edit: Aug 12, 2015, 08:28 am by Riva
I am starting to thinking solid core may be easier to use.

What does everyone else use?
Now I'm back at work to check, you can get tinned copper wire from RS (355-079) at a reasonable price.
For Thailand check here.
Don't PM me for help as I will ignore it.

aisc

Now I'm back at work to check, you can get tinned copper wire from RS (355-079) at a reasonable price.
For Thailand check here.
Thanks Riva. That is certainly a good option.

BTW are in TH or just a strong interest in all things Thai?

Riva

Not in Thailand but love visiting the country and given half the chance would retire there when the time came, though wify wants to go back to Scotland when we retire.
We always stay for a few day in Bangkok every trip and invariably I end up at Pantip Plaza and the Weekend market if time permits.
Don't PM me for help as I will ignore it.

aisc

Well on my last visit to Pantip, a good 6 months ago, I had the distinct impression it is no longer the pre-eminent computer resource mall it used to be. It seems to have been overtaken by Fortune Town which is also much more conveniently sited on the MRT line.

I think the drop in laptop prices has been synonymous with a drop in desktop hardware sales.
A few years ago I used to build my own desktops. These days I don't even own a desktop.
Other areas have mushroomed - like parallel ink supplies.

FWIW the good thing about the Cat-5 cable is even insulated, it can pass through the holes in my prototype PCB - which is going to be very useful.

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