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Topic: Designing Schematics nicely (Read 2160 times) previous topic - next topic

Grumpy_Mike

Or KiCad, open source alternative. It's becoming better and better.
I have used KiCad and can vouch for that comment.

But the problem remains with any package of how to find the correct symbol. That is why I think a general draw package is easier for hobby use. You can copy symbols you have used before or just draw new ones. This is especially important when you want to change the order of the pinout on an IC to make the schematic look cleaner and avoid all those unnecessary lines crossing.

septillion

I have barely ever made a symbol. Sometimes I edit one but most of the times I don't need to. That's because of the enormous amount of symbols and footprints this guy made. As well as the KiCad GitHub.
Use fricking code tags!!!!
I want x => I would like x, I need help => I would like help, Need fast => Go and pay someone to do the job...

NEW Library to make fading leds a piece of cake
https://github.com/septillion-git/FadeLed

polymorph

I have found Diptrace much simpler to learn than Eagle, and have already created a component in it.

It comes in Windows, Linux, and OSX versions. Free for noncommercial use, PCBs are limited to 500 pins. Email them and they will send you and upgrade to a 1000 pin limit.

http://diptrace.com/download-diptrace/

Better to learn a schematic package that will also allow you to make PCBs in the future.
Steve Greenfield AE7HD
Drawing Schematics: tinyurl.com/23mo9pf - tinyurl.com/o97ysyx - https://tinyurl.com/Technote8
Multitasking: forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=223286.0
gammon.com.au/blink - gammon.com.au/serial - gammon.com.au/interrupts

CrossRoads

I created a set of slides for creating symbols in Eagle. It's not that hard once you do it a few times.
1. Create the mechanical footprint. (pads & outline)
2. Create the schematic symbol.
3. Marry the 2 together.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

westfw

I found it very frustrating to try to use fritzing to draw "nice" schematics; it was FAR too difficult to "neaten" a rough diagram...  There are similar problems with many generic "drawing" packages; when you attach signals to a part on a schematic, you want there to be an actual "attachment" that isn't changed simply by moving the art and/or the wires...

russellz

I found it very frustrating to try to use fritzing to draw "nice" schematics; it was FAR too difficult to "neaten" a rough diagram...  There are similar problems with many generic "drawing" packages; when you attach signals to a part on a schematic, you want there to be an actual "attachment" that isn't changed simply by moving the art and/or the wires...

It can be done with a proper 2D CAD package but it's much easier using a dedicated schematic package.  I tend to use the schematics part of LTSpice but that's just personal preference.

Russell.
Retired after 40 years as a chartered engineer working mostly with RF and analogue electronics.

adamants

it's great to have all the advise coming in. i have attached a small schematic i have done. would this be considered ok? have i used too many or to few Net Labels etc?

MorganS

Not bad and you've definitely used appropriate net labels.

I would tend to combine all of the power supply (input jack, capacitor and regulator) into one block instead of using net labels.

The ground symbol on the left of the '328 is really clogging things up and pushing other wires around. Drag it down below the chip (the ground wire will cross under the other connections) and then rearrange 5V and the other wires to come in straighter.

The switch at the top looks like a representation of the common 4-wire tactile switch. In schematics you don't usually show all 4 wires - just the two logical pins. Having 5V flow "across" the switch looks odd.
"The problem is in the code you didn't post."

russellz

That's pretty good for Fritzing!  Well done.

Russell.
Retired after 40 years as a chartered engineer working mostly with RF and analogue electronics.

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