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Topic: Learning how to read schematic (Read 5470 times) previous topic - next topic

raschemmel

LarryD,
Ha, ha.
A real schematic is a universal language understood almost anywhere. I admit, if I saw a Russian schematic I wouldn't understand any of the labels but I would recognize the circuits.
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Grumpy_Mike

That is exactly what happened when I visited The USSR in 1991, my son bought an electronics kit ( for $1.00 ) and because there were schematics in it he could use it.

raschemmel

#17
Jan 19, 2016, 10:20 am Last Edit: Jan 19, 2016, 10:40 am by raschemmel
How much did the kit cost ?

Do they have a Russian warehouse supermarket Cosco equivilent ?
What is the Russian version of a "fast food" restaurant? (stuffed potatoes?)
Arduino UNOs, Pro-Minis, ATMega328, ATtiny85, LCDs, MCP4162, keypads,<br />DS18B20s,74c922,nRF24L01, RS232, SD card, RC fixed wing, quadcopter

Grumpy_Mike

Well this was in the days before the fall of the USSR when the street exchange rate was about 50 Rubles to the dollar. It was a rip off kit that cost in the west about $40. I still have it somewhere.

Boardburner2

How many mars bars does that translate to , or should it be mcchicken nuggets these days.

Grumpy_Mike

#20
Jan 19, 2016, 05:45 pm Last Edit: Jan 19, 2016, 05:45 pm by Grumpy_Mike
Found it:-

larryd

I thought I was the biggest Pack Rat   8)
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raschemmel

I'll bet there were some good radio circuits in that kit. I built a RadioShack VHF kit when I first started learning electronics and then added a FET squelch-switch and a 5W audio power amplifier just for fun.
Arduino UNOs, Pro-Minis, ATMega328, ATtiny85, LCDs, MCP4162, keypads,<br />DS18B20s,74c922,nRF24L01, RS232, SD card, RC fixed wing, quadcopter

phoxx

I spent many years drawing "schematics" which we called elementary diagrams which were then used to produce working control systems.  So here are a few of the drawings produced and the rules for producing them:

1/ Block diagram---The engineer might produce functional block diagrams for himself or to discuss the system with other engineers or to compose his own thoughts.

2/  Elementary diagram--The engineer would produce this diagram showing what is connected to what with no concern for the actual location of components nor with the order in which they were connected to each other.  The prime requirement was that they be arranged for easy comprehension by others.  This could be a ladder diagram for relays, contactors, push buttons etc. or for electronics (opamps, logic gates etc. ) it could be arranged according to signal flow, easiest to understand if the flow is left to right, top to bottom.  This diagram was used to get parts on order and to pass on information to others, primarily draftsmen.

3/Parts layout drawings---One group of draftsmen would look at the parts ordered and make a layout drawing showing them mounted in a cubicle or on a panel.

4/Wiring diagrams---Another group of draftsmen would look at the elementary diagram and produce a drawing of wires connected terminal "a" device "1" to terminal "b" device "2" to -----.  I hope you get the idea.
This might also be a printed running list rather than a picture.

5/In the meantime the engineer would produce written test instructions.

I hope this gives some insight into "schematics" and "wiring diagrams" and there reason for existence.

Boardburner2

I had a kit something very similar as Youngster.

I found i rapidly learned the basics of schematics, couple of days.

Progressed rapidly after that , just a case of learning all the new symbols.

Understanding circuit action took about 40 years longer.

ChrisTenone

#25
Jan 20, 2016, 06:15 am Last Edit: Jan 20, 2016, 06:16 am by ChrisTenone
Found it:-

That is SO COOL!
I had electronic kits (a couple of them) back in the late 50s and early 60s. There was something totally 'cold war' about them, as there was with most toys, especially techy toys, back then. Seeing that the "other side" was just like us is very reassuring, and justifies my hippy past in a way.
----
ps keeping on topic, I draw terrible schematics - I still do that semicircular jump over unconnected wires that I learned in the cold war days  - and something always needs to be squeezed in on an angle. But then, I draw them for me, so I can easily remember what I was doing. Very much a language!
What, I need to say something else too?

OldSteve

.....I still do that semicircular jump over unconnected wires that I learned in the cold war days.....
Nothing wrong with that, Chris. I do exactly the same - it makes a schematic much easier to read. Blobs on connections, and 'jumpers' where there are no connections.
Please do not PM me for help. I am not a personal consultant.
And others will benefit as well if you post your question publicly on the forums.

raschemmel

#27
Jan 20, 2016, 06:49 am Last Edit: Jan 20, 2016, 06:52 am by raschemmel
When I was a restaurant cook with 12 years experience trying to cross-train myself into electronics I toured ALL the electronic stores every day ( and cooked every night).None of the electronics store clerks knew I was a cook. I bought all  the childrens electronic kits and built them after work until the sun came up. Every time I bought one  they would comment " The kids must really like these electronics kits !"
to which I would reply "Oh they love 'em !"
I would see how many different circuits I ciuld connect together to make more complex circuits,
The 555 Timer circuits were the easiest to combine.

Arduino UNOs, Pro-Minis, ATMega328, ATtiny85, LCDs, MCP4162, keypads,<br />DS18B20s,74c922,nRF24L01, RS232, SD card, RC fixed wing, quadcopter

larryd

#28
Jan 20, 2016, 07:07 am Last Edit: Jan 20, 2016, 07:07 am by LarryD
Nothing wrong with that, Chris. I do exactly the same - it makes a schematic much easier to read. Blobs on connections, and 'jumpers' where there are no connections.
I have easily converted to the new way:



.
No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

OldSteve

I have easily converted to the new way:

Converting is simple, but for me reading is harder.
My problem is very poor eyesight, and it's easy for me to miss the blobs that indicate a connection, so I stick with the jumper method, even though it does take a little longer. Then whether or not I see the blob itself, I know there's a connection if there's no 'jumper'. And like Chris, my schematics are primarily only for my own use, so I don't feel the need to stick to any convention.
I use Paint for my schematics, and keep a file of commonly-used components to copy and paste. That jumper is just one of those commonly-used components. I even have a ready-made 'blob' as well, for connections.
Please do not PM me for help. I am not a personal consultant.
And others will benefit as well if you post your question publicly on the forums.

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